Texas Women Writers: A Tradition of Their Own

By Sylvia Ann Grider; Lou Halsell Rodenberger | Go to book overview

TEXAS WOMEN WRITERS
A Tradition of Their Own

EDITED BY Sylvia Ann Grider & Lou Halsell Rodenberger

Texas A&M University Press College Station

-iii-

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Texas Women Writers: A Tradition of Their Own
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction - Texas Women Writers, 1830-1995: a Tradition of Their Own 3
  • Part 1 - Prose Writers 47
  • Notes 66
  • Fiction by Texas Women, 1846-1920 68
  • Mabel Major 82
  • Karle Wilson Baker and Charlotte Baker Montgomery 87
  • Ruth Cross 94
  • Loula Grace Erdman 100
  • Jewel Gibson 106
  • Notes 115
  • Elithe Hamilton Kirkland 116
  • Notes 123
  • Katherine Anne Porter 124
  • Dorothy Scarborough 134
  • Notes 140
  • The Professionals, 1960-95 141
  • Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey 143
  • Laura Furman, Beverly Lowry, and Shelby Hearon 148
  • Jane Gilmore Rushing 160
  • Carolyn Osborn 166
  • A Reflection of Place and History - The Short Story 172
  • Notes 187
  • Let the Works Define the Field: Contemporary Creative Nonfiction 189
  • Well-Told Tales: Children's Book Writers 198
  • Part 2 - Tejana and African-American Writers 203
  • Notes 245
  • A Developing Tradition - African-American Writers 247
  • Literary Traditions in Works by African-American Playwrights 253
  • Part 3 - Poets 257
  • Notes 284
  • The Buried Life - Texas Women Poets, 1920-60 286
  • Exploring the New Psychic Geography - Vassar Miller, Jan Epton Seale, and Sandra Lynn 294
  • Three Contemporary Poets - Naomi Shihab Nye, Pattiann Rogers, and Betsy Feagan Colquitt 310
  • Part 4 - Dramatists 321
  • Part 5 - Symposium 339
  • Notes 357
  • Bibliography 359
  • Contributors 433
  • Index 439
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