The Historiography of the British Empire-Commonwealth: Trends, Interpretations and Resources

By Robin W. Winks | Go to book overview

CANADA

Robin W. Winks

CANADIAN HISTORIOGRAPHY1 occupies a position roughly midway between the highly developed and self-conscious historiographical traditions of the United States, Germany, or the Soviet Union, and the almost totally undeveloped historiography of Pakistan or Malaysia. But among members of the Commonwealth of Nations, the extent of the Canadian literature of historical self-examination is second only to that of the United Kingdom itself. Most of this body of literature is straightforward "history of history," bibliographical rather than historiographical, in the nature of a census.2 And since

____________________
1
The present essay is based closely upon my own Recent Trends and New Literature in Canadian History (Washington, 1959). I am grateful to the Service Center for Teachers of History and to the American Historical Association for permission to reprint portions of that booklet.
2
The following references extend, support, and contradict this essay: Gustave Lanctôt , "Past Historians and Present History in Canada", Canadian Historical Review ( Toronto) (hereafter CHR), XXII ( Sept , 1941), 241-53; Donald Grant Creighton , "Towards the Discovery of Canada", The University of Toronto Quarterly ( Toronto), XXV ( April, 1956), 269-82; and his "Presidential Address," Canadian Historical Association (hereafter C.H.A.) Report ( 1957) ( Toronto), pp. 1-12; William Menzies Whitelaw, "Canadian History in Retrospect", C.H.A. Report ( 1956), pp. 38-44; Reginald George Trotter, "Historical Research in Canada", CHR, XX ( Sept., 1939), 251-57; George McKinnon Wrong, "The Beginnings of Historical Criticism in Canada: A Retrospect, 1896-1936", ibid., XVII ( March, 1936), 1-18; William Lewis Morton, "Clio in Canada: The Interpretation of Canadian History", University of Toronto Quarterly, XV ( April, 1946), 277-34, and "History, 'Writing and Teaching of", Encyclopaedia Canadiana ( Ottawa, 1958), V, 129-33; Crawford Brough Macpherson, "The Social Sciences", in Julian Park, ed., The Culture of Contemporary Canada ( Ithaca, 1957), pp. 181-221; David Corbett, "The Social Sciences in Canada", Queen's Quarterly ( Kingston), LXVI (Spring, 1959), 56-72; Michel Brunet, "Coexistence, Canadian Style: A Nationalistic View", ibid. (Autumn, 1956), pp. 424-31; William A. Mackintosh, "Adam Shortt", in Robert Charles Wallace , ed., Some Great Men of Queen's ( Toronto, 1941), pp. 115-33; Chester Bailey Martin , "Professor G. M. Wrong and History in Canada", in Ralph Flenley, ed., Essays in Canadian History ( Toronto, 1939), pp. 1-23, and "Fifty Years of Canadian History", The Royal Society of Canada, Fifty Years Retrospect: Anniversary Volume, 1882-1932, XX ( Ottawa, [ 1932]), 63-69; Hilda Marion Neatby, "The Dangers of History", La Nouvelle revue canadienne ( Ottawa), I ( July, 1951), 21-33; Hugh McDowell Clokie , "Canadian Contributions to Political Science", Culture ( Quebec), III ( Dec , 1942), 467-74; William Thomas Easterbrook, "Trends in Canadian Economic Thought"

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The Historiography of the British Empire-Commonwealth: Trends, Interpretations and Resources
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contributors ix
  • Introduction 3
  • The American Continental Colonies in the Empire 23
  • The Empire Since 1783 46
  • Canada 69
  • Australia 137
  • New Zealand 174
  • The British Territories in the Pacific 197
  • South Africa 212
  • British Central Africa 237
  • British East Africa 248
  • British West Africa 261
  • Egypt and the Sudan 279
  • Great Britain and Inter­national Trusteeship: the Mandate System 296
  • Gibraltar, Malta, and Cyprus 312
  • Ireland's Commonwealth Years, 1922-1949 326
  • The British West Indies 344
  • India 357
  • Pakistan 396
  • Ceylon 421
  • Burma 448
  • Malaysia 460
  • Commonwealth Literature: Developments and Prospects 493
  • Appendix: An American Report 523
  • Index 529
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