Interpersonal Communication: Evolving Interpersonal Relationships

By Pamela J. Kalbfleisch | Go to book overview

12
From Passion to Commitment:
Turning Points in Romantic
Relationships

Connie Bullis University of Utah

Carolyn Clark
University of Utah

Rick Sline
University of Utah

Thirty years ago, Bolton ( 1961) asserted the importance of the turning point as a unit of analysis for understanding the development of romantic relationships. Since that time, relatively few studies have been conducted that examine this potentially important "window for understanding" the ups and downs of romantic associations between women and men. At the same time, relational scholars have increasingly adopted relational theories that are consistent with turning point analysis. For example, in introducing several essays, Duck ( 1988) cited his own earlier contention that "relational development should not be assumed to be smooth rather than jerky; steady in growth rather than marked by times of activity and inactivity; continuous rather than discontinuous; and characterized by smooth growth curves rather than steps and plateaux" (p. 363). Turning point analysis provides a means of empirically exploring a rich array of questions and issues associated with this contemporary view of relationship development. In spite of its proven value in past studies and its rich potential for the empirical study of current theories, turning point analysis has been under used to date.

Turning point analysis has been profitably used to study the rate of change in romantic relationships ( Huston, Surra, Fitzgerald, & Cate, 1981); general reasons for turning points ( Lloyd & Cate, 1984; Surra, 1984; Surra, Arizzi, & Asmussen, 1988); how particular events function in a variety of ways to create changes in relationships ( Bullis & Baxter, 1985); commitment processes ( Surra et al., 1988); organizational socialization ( Bullis & Bach, 1989a; Kirk & Todd-Mancillas, 1989); and mentor relationships ( Bullis & Bach,

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Interpersonal Communication: Evolving Interpersonal Relationships
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.