International Aspects of German Racial Policies

By Oscar I. Janowsky; Melvin M. Fagen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
PRECEDENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL ACTION
TO SAFEGUARD HUMAN RIGHTS

SINCE its establishment in I933, the German National Socialist Government has systematically persecuted a large body of its citizens and subjects. i. Hundreds of thousands of law‐ abiding and loyal individuals have been deprived of citizenship, of civil and political equality and of the means of earning a livelihood. Fully one hundred thousand persons have already sought relief in flight, and the increasing rigors of persecution must inevitably drive more and more victims to leave their homeland and seek refuge abroad.

Such persecution is not without precedent, although the pretended cause of persecution, difference of "racial" origin, appears novel. In former times, intolerance and oppression were visited upon those who differed in religious belief from the dominant element in the country, whereas today the fiction of religious equality is maintained in Germany. The effect, however, is the same. Men, women and children have been deprived of elementary human rights, humiliated and impoverished. Distinctions between racial and religious persecution are meaningless; for, as the American Government became aware in its controversy with Tsarist Russia, the two questions are inseparable. 2. It is immaterial whether religious belief or racial origin is advanced as the excuse for making

____________________
2.
Papers Relating to the Foreign Relations of the United States (hereafter referred to as Foreign Relations), 1895), pp.IO58ff.
i.
For a description of the methods and results of the National Socialist program, see the Letter of Resignation of James G.McDonald, High Commissioner for Refugees (Jewish and Other) Coming from Germany, addressed to the Secretary General of the League of Nations ( London, December 27th, I935), especially the Annex, Chapters I-4.

-i-

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