International Aspects of German Racial Policies

By Oscar I. Janowsky; Melvin M. Fagen | Go to book overview

from whose intolerable persecution they have fled, and where they will be placed in concentration camps, or being cast into prison upon their expulsion for illegal entry into a country other than Germany, or evading the expulsion order and thereby becoming subject to imprisonment as criminals.

The psychological and spiritual effects of these conditions can hardly be over-stated. The number of suicides, the distortion of minds and the breaking down of bodies, the deaths of children through malnutrition—are tragic witness to these consequences.


NOTES
I.
See p.I44.
3.
Court decisions have emphasized that Jews are, according to German public law, only "guests" of the National Socialist State. See above, p.2O6, for a decision of the Hamburg Amtsgericht on June 29th, 1935).
4.
Reichsgesetzblatt, No. 8I, I933), I, p.48O.
5.
Ibid., No. 87, I933.
6.
I.e. those who oppose the National Socialist régime.
7.
Article 3 of the Law of July I4th.
8.
The Polish Law of Nationality of January 2Oth, I92O, declares that
"Polish citizenship shall be lost by acquiring foreign citizenship"
(Article II). The Austrian Law of July 3Oth, I925, as well as the Nationality Laws of the other East European States, contain the same provision. See Flournoy, R. and Hudson, M. A Collection of Nationality Laws, pp.I8-9.
9.
The German Law of July 22nd, I9I3, may be found in Flournoy and Hudson, op. cit., p.3O7.
IO.
The figures given above do not include those who were denationalized because they were alleged to have attempted to take their property out of Germany as refugees.
II.
New York Times, March I3th, 1935), P.I3.
12.
But, although emigration be encouraged, the Government does not want to lose a lucrative source of revenue in the tax placed upon emigration. As a result, even though the law requiring this emigrants' tax exempts from payment those whose emigration is in the interests of Germany, the Ministry of Finance refused to be bound by its previous encouragement of emigration of Jews as desirable. The tax must, it held, be paid. See above, p.2O9.
I3.
Frankfurter Zeitung, May I7th, 1934).
I4.
Issue of March 9th, I935.

-227-

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