International Aspects of German Racial Policies

By Oscar I. Janowsky; Melvin M. Fagen | Go to book overview

POSTSCRIPT
By Josiah C.Wedgwood, M.P.

WHEN persecution of minorities becomes a matter of declared national policy an international issue is raised. The world's moral judgment is required. During the past two centuries there has been a steadily increasing recognition of this principle. The minority treaties after the world war, and the covenant of the League of Nations both gave express recognition to the international aspect of persecution of minorities whenever such persecution becomes a matter of national policy. During many decades leading statesmen of the world have given voice to such views. This book makes a powerful case in support of these principles. The refugee problems created by persecutions and even eliminations, which are matters of national policy, cannot be solved by philanthropic action. They must be faced and grappled with at the source. Civilization, enlightened world opinion, the conscience of mankind, and sound and strongly supported principles of international law call for intercession and for a moral judgment against those nations which violate the ultimate principles of morality upon which rest the very foundation stones of civilization. This book, in marshaling the opinion and conduct of civilized mankind in respect to these matters, is of importance and of value.

The principles for which this book argues have long been supported by liberal statesmen and enlightened governments. The failure to support such principles would be a tragic acknowledgment of moral bankruptcy by what we are pleased to call the civilized world. There can be no amity in the family of nations if members of that family are permitted without protest to make persecution a cornerstone of their national policy.

JOSIAH C.WEDGWOOD, M.P.

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