Historical Dictionary of the French Revolution 1789-1799 - Vol. 1

By Samuel F. Scott; Barry Rothaus | Go to book overview

F

FABRE, PHILLIPE-FRANCOIS (FABRE D'EGLANTINE)( 1750-1794), poet and conventionnel. Fabre adopted the name d'Eglantine after supposedly winning a prize, a wreath of eglantine, in a literary contest in the floral games in Toulouse in 1771. He viewed the Revolution as a play and himself as a major actor both in and behind the scenes. As a comic satirist of society and politics, he produced eleven plays, all in verse, between September 1787 and March 1792. His most noted and finest was Le Philinte de Molière ( 1790), which incorporated his devotion to F. Molière, Rousseauism, and revolutionism.

With the opening of the Cordeliers club in the spring of 1790, Fabre d'Eglantine emerged as a leading spokesman and as its president. But the apex of his career was attained during the Revolutionary events of 1792-93. On 10 August 1792 he was one of the few Revolutionary leaders who actually participated in the attack on the Tuileries. He was selected by G.-J. Danton as one of his secretaries and became a member of his inner circle. Fabre's influence increased when he was elected as a Paris deputy to the National Convention.

He supported dechristianization by applying his poetic talents to the nomenclature of the Revolutionary calendar. As indicated in his report to the Convention on 24 October 1793, poetic or agrarian names were given to months, such as Vendémiaire, Brumaire, and Frimaire. Sundays were eliminated since each month was to be divided into three equal parts, or décades.

His implication in the foreign plot conspiracy and the affair of the Compagnie des Indes led to the destruction of the Mountain and intensified factionalism within the Convention. In October 1793 the alleged foreign plot was exposed by Fabre when he met with M. Robespierre, L.-A. de Saint-Just, and the Committee of General Security, where he proceeded to denounce such men as P. Proli, F. Desfieux, and P.-U. Dubuisson as foreign conspirators trying to destroy the Republic. Actually, the accusations were false and politically motivated to obtain public support. Subsequently, fearing attack as an ally of Danton, he denounced the Hébertists as partisans of violent and extreme measures. Fabre

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Historical Dictionary of the French Revolution 1789-1799 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contributors vii
  • Preface xi
  • Abbreviations of Journals In References xv
  • The Dictionary 1
  • A 3
  • B 47
  • C 137
  • D 283
  • E 343
  • F 371
  • G 423
  • H 457
  • I 469
  • J 485
  • K 525
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