Jackson Versus Biddle: The Struggle over the Second Bank of the United States

By George Rogers Taylor | Go to book overview

Portland Daily Advertiser: AN EDITORIAL

THERE is no part of the Veto Message more deservedly reprobated, and more reprehensible, than that part which attempts to array the poor against the rich, and thus to set in opposition the prejudices which one class may have against another. The object of all banks, it is more than insinuated, is to make the rich richer and the poor poorer. We will not dwell upon the refutation of so unworthy an insinuation. But we ask the property-holders, if they are willing to lend a hand for some new Agrarian project, which shall upset all the rights of property, and establish an equal division of estates and chattels. A more deranging, radical, law upsetting document was never promulgated by the wildest Roman fanatic. The revolutionists of France went but little further. But how undignified, how disreputable is it, in the President of a constitutional republic to lay his blows not only upon the laws and upon the Judiciary, but even to degrade his station by insinuations, which would do discredit to Cromwell or the people- loving Robespierre. Is the President preparing for a crown by cajoling us with the prospect of an equal division of goods -- by offering his aid to overturn the rights of property, to humble the wealthy, and to put down the exalted? If so, we ask, which is worth the most, monarchy, despotism, the tyranny of one man -- or, honorable poverty, and the present enjoyment of a constitution and laws which throw the field of exertion wide open to industry, energy, and economy? Let it be remembered that every military chieftain, Sylla, Caesar, Cromwell, all have obtained unlimited and despotic power by pretending to be the sole friends of the People and often by denouncing the rich, and by cajoling the poor with prospects, which they never intended to be realized, or only realized with chains and slavery, and dungeons, or enrollment in the legions assembled to add to the power of the tyrant.

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