PREFACE.

A copy of this book, entitled "The Japanese in America," was given to me by Mr. Arinori Mori in 1873. As there are only a few left who remember the book, I wish that it be preserved as a reminiscence of the Old; therefore I have reproduced it to be distributed anew.

As there are no longer many comrades of the early days, I may be permitted to tell in a few words of how I became one of the pioneer Japanese students in the United States. While attending the special department of the Imperial University I was ordered to go to England, my fellow-students being Kijiro Hasegawa, Keigoro Katsuki and Soichiro Matsumoto. We consulted together as to how best Japan could renovate itself. We wished to study in America, and stated our intention to Baron Kato, superintendent, who said that authority would be given us to make a free choice of place and of subjects of study, adding, however, that the Nation needed good servants who could be of most use after their return to Japan.

Mr. Katsuki, though a young man, had studied at Nagasaki under Dr. Verbeck, and so benefited our little circle by his liberal, advanced views on national affairs.

Through the introduction of Dr. Verbeck, when we arrived in New York we called on Dr. Ferris, 34 Vesey street, just opposite the Park National Bank. While Dr. Ferris was arranging our place of study we stayed at the Pierrepont House, Brooklyn. We were soon placed under

-I-

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The Japanese in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface. I
  • Part I. the Japanese Embassy. 5
  • Part Ii. the Japanese Students. 55
  • Part Ii. the Japanese Students. 67
  • The Chinese Ambassador in France. 72
  • Co-Education of Boys and Girls. 79
  • Oriental Civilization. 82
  • History of Japan. 86
  • Christianity in Japan. 91
  • The Strength and the Weakness of Republics. 94
  • The Japanese Costume. 100
  • A Father's Letter. 103
  • The Memorable Year. 108
  • George Washington. 114
  • Public and Private Schools. 117
  • Christmas. 124
  • Japanese Poetry. 127
  • Part Iii. Life and Resources in America. 137
  • Introdudtion. 139
  • Official and Political Life. 143
  • Life Among the Farmers and Planters. 159
  • Commercial Life and Developments. 186
  • Life Among the Mechanics. 203
  • Religious Life and Institutions. 215
  • Life in the Factories. 246
  • Educational Life and Institutions. 265
  • Literary, Artistic, and Scientific Life. 282
  • Life Among the Miners. 301
  • Life in the Army and Navy. 312
  • Life in the Leading Cities. 322
  • Frontier Life and Developments. 337
  • Judicial Life. 344
  • Additional Notes. 351
  • Appendix the Imperial Japanese Government's Special Finance and Economic Commission to the United States Headed by Baron Tanetaro Megata - (september 1917-April 1918) 353
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