LIFE IN THE LEADING CITIES.

THE total number of incorporated cities in the United States is 409, but many of them do not contain more than 2,000 inhabitants. By far the largest proportion of foreigners who come to this country across the Atlantic Ocean, enter the country at the port of New York, which is the largest city in the Western Hemisphere. It was founded by the Dutch, and called by them New Amsterdam. It occupies the greater part of an island called Manhattan, which is 13½ miles long, and contains an area of 22 miles. The cities of Brooklyn and Jersey City, and several other towns, although having each a government of its own, are in reality portions of New York, and their combined population is not far from 1,500,000. According to the last census, the population of New York by itself was 942,292; of whom 523,198 were born in the United States, and 484,109 in the State of New York. Within eight miles of the commercial metropolis, in New Jersey, is a city called Newark, of 100,000 people, but it is so closely identified with the former in its business and social interests as almost to be considered a suburb of New York. During the last fifteen years the number of immigrants arriving there, from various parts of the world, was about 2,341,000, the arrivals for 1870 alone having been 211,190, and it is estimated that about four-fifths of these foreigners found

-322-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Japanese in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface. I
  • Part I. the Japanese Embassy. 5
  • Part Ii. the Japanese Students. 55
  • Part Ii. the Japanese Students. 67
  • The Chinese Ambassador in France. 72
  • Co-Education of Boys and Girls. 79
  • Oriental Civilization. 82
  • History of Japan. 86
  • Christianity in Japan. 91
  • The Strength and the Weakness of Republics. 94
  • The Japanese Costume. 100
  • A Father's Letter. 103
  • The Memorable Year. 108
  • George Washington. 114
  • Public and Private Schools. 117
  • Christmas. 124
  • Japanese Poetry. 127
  • Part Iii. Life and Resources in America. 137
  • Introdudtion. 139
  • Official and Political Life. 143
  • Life Among the Farmers and Planters. 159
  • Commercial Life and Developments. 186
  • Life Among the Mechanics. 203
  • Religious Life and Institutions. 215
  • Life in the Factories. 246
  • Educational Life and Institutions. 265
  • Literary, Artistic, and Scientific Life. 282
  • Life Among the Miners. 301
  • Life in the Army and Navy. 312
  • Life in the Leading Cities. 322
  • Frontier Life and Developments. 337
  • Judicial Life. 344
  • Additional Notes. 351
  • Appendix the Imperial Japanese Government's Special Finance and Economic Commission to the United States Headed by Baron Tanetaro Megata - (september 1917-April 1918) 353
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 356

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.