Social Statics, Abridged and Revised: Together with the Man Versus the State

By Herbert Spencer | Go to book overview

PREFACE.

PUBLISHED in December, 1850, this work in its original form was entitled Social Statics: or, the Conditions essential to Human Happiness specified, and the first of them developed. A number of years passed -- some ten, I think -- before the edition was exhausted; and as the demand seemed not great enough to warrant the setting up of type for a new edition, it was decided to import an edition from America, where the work had been stereotyped. After this had been disposed of a third edition was similarly imported.

In the meantime I had relinquished some of the conclusions drawn from the first principle laid down. Further, though still adhering to this first principle, one, of the bases assigned for it had been given up by me. To the successive editions I therefore prefixed the statement that some of the doctrines set forth needed qualification; but excused myself from making the changes called for, because they could not be made without suspending more important work. Eventually, it became manifest that the warning given did not prevent misinterpretations of my later beliefs; and, therefore, ten years ago, after all copies of the third edition had been sold, I resolved not again to import a supply to meet the stillcontinued demand.

As, however, the fundamental idea enunciated, and many of the deductions have survived in me, I have all along intended that these should be put in a permanently accessible form; and in 1890 at leisure times I went through the work, erasing some portions, abridging others, and subjecting the whole to a careful verbal revision. Its purely systematic division is now replaced by Part IV. of The Principles of Ethics: Justice -- a part in which the ethical doctrine originally set

-3-

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Social Statics, Abridged and Revised: Together with the Man Versus the State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface. 3
  • Contents 5
  • Happiness as an Immediate Aim. 7
  • The Man Versus the State. 275
  • Preface. 277
  • Contents 279
  • The Man Versus the State. 281
  • Subject-Index to Social Statics and Man Versus State. 421
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