Social Statics, Abridged and Revised: Together with the Man Versus the State

By Herbert Spencer | Go to book overview

THE MAN VERSUS THE STATE.

THE NEW TORYISM.

MOST Of those Who now pass as Liberals, are Tories of a new type. This is a paradox which I propose to justify. That I may justify it, I must first point out what the two political parties originally were; and I must then ask the reader to bear with me while I remind him of facts he is familiar with, that I may impress on him the intrinsic natures of Toryism. and Liberalisin properly so called.

Dating back to an earlier period than their names, the two political parties at first stood respectively for two opposed types of social organization, broadly distinguishable as the militant and the industrial -- types which are characterized, the one by the, régime of status, almost universal in ancient days, and the other by the régime of contract, which has become general in modern day, chiefly among the Western nations, and especially among ourselves and the Americans. If, instead of using the word " co-operation " in a limited sense, we use it in its widest sense, as signifying the combined activities of citizens under whatever system of regulation; then these two are definable as the system of compulsory co-operation and the System of voluntary co-operation. The typical structure of the one we see in an army formed of conscripts, in which the units in their several grades have to fulfil commands under pain of death, and receive food and

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Social Statics, Abridged and Revised: Together with the Man Versus the State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface. 3
  • Contents 5
  • Happiness as an Immediate Aim. 7
  • The Man Versus the State. 275
  • Preface. 277
  • Contents 279
  • The Man Versus the State. 281
  • Subject-Index to Social Statics and Man Versus State. 421
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