Forbidden Books in American Public Libraries, 1876-1939: A Study in Cultural Change

By Evelyn Geller | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abolitionism, 5, 11, 13
Academia, structural changes in, 145
Academic freedom, xv, xviii, 66, 70, 104, 143-145, 159, 188; state versus private universities, 145
Academic freedom cases. See Court cases: Brown University
Access, freedom of, 51, 67
Adam Bede, 33, 133
Adams, Charles Francis, Jr., 53
Adams, Hannah, 5
Adams, Henry, 36
Adult education, 140, 165
Adultery, in fiction, 36, 37-38
Advocacy, xix, 50
Advocacy and freedom, 111
Advocacy versus neutrality. See Neutrality: versus advocacy
Advocacy versus objectivity, 71
Age, 57, 191-192
Ahern, Mary, 54, 130
Ainsworth, William Harrison, 20, 36
ALA. See American Library Association
Alcott, Louisa May, 38
Aldrich, Thomas B. (Stillwater Tragedy), 55
Alger, Horatio, 20-21, 26, 36, 55, 59
Algerism, 31
Alien and Sedition laws, 23
All Quiet on the Western Front, 137, 139
Altgeld, John, 49, 56, 65
Amazing Marriage, The, 58, 59
America Comes of Age, 99
American Bar Association, 192
American Civil Liberties Union, 112, 115, 133
Americanization, 81, 132
American Library Association, xx, 17, 29; neutrality and civil liberties issues, 156; and planning, 154; response to depression, 151-152; segregation, 163; survey of questionable books, 36.
American Library Association's catalogs and catalog Supplements: 1893 catalog, 54-56; 1896 Supplement, 56-59; 1904 catalog, 59, 93-97; 1904-1911 Supplement, 105-108; 1912-1921 Supplement, 119-121; 1926 catalog, 141-143; 1926-1931 Supplement, 141-143
American Medical Association, 192
American Mercury, 131-133
American Public Library and the Diffusion of Knowledge, The, 128
American Union Against Militarism, 114
Anarchism, 66
Anarchists, 31, 48, 50, 79
Andrews, Benjamin, 71
Anna Karenina, 38
Ann Veronica, 100
Anticensorship campaign, Boston, 1927, 133
Anticensorship lobby, 137-139
Antiobscenity laws, 23
Antisedition laws, 23
Antistatism, 70
Appointments. See Politics in libraries
Arabian Nights, 53
Arena, 31, 43
Army Index, 112, 114; Publishers Weekly editorial on, 114
Asheim, Lester, 165
Astor Library, 10, 30, 53
Authority: versus innovation, 84-85; intellectual, 84-85; outside, 63; scholarly, 46
Autonomy. See Institutional autonomy; Professional autonomy; Status autonomy

-223-

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