Basic and Applied Memory Research: Practical Applications - Vol. 2

By Douglas J. Herrmann; Cathy McEvoy et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE The Promise of Compact Disc-interactive Technology for Memory Training With the Elderly

Dana J. Plude Lisa K. Schwartz University of Maryland

The memory training literature shows that older adults benefit from strategy training conducted by an instructor (or therapist) in either individualized or classroom settings ( West, 1989; Yesavage, 1985). However, despite their demonstrated effectiveness among elderly trainees, mnemonic techniques are often abandoned within a relatively short span of time ( Anschutz, Camp, Markley, & Kramer, 1985, 1987). Recently, Neely and Backman ( 1993) found that six months after mnemonic training elderly participants could effectively use learned strategies to facilitate word recall; however, fewer than 40% of the subjects reported actually using the strategies in their everyday life. Failure to generalize strategy usage outside the laboratory setting may reflect a deficiency in standard memory training procedures in that they typically do not involve real-life situations. In addition, the failure to generalize training outside of the laboratory may reflect the lack of sustained exposure to mnemonic training ( Finkel & Yesavage, 1990; Riley, 1992). In order to be retained and effectively integrated into the older adult's strategic arsenal, mnemonic strategies must be continued and reinforced within the individual's everyday environment ( Yesavage, 1985). Rarely, however, are memory training interventions available to the elderly on a daily basis, and this lack of availability doubtless undermines the sustained use of such skills. Clearly, additional means of training and education are necessary.

One alternate mode of training involves videotape. Videotape is desirable because it provides both visual and auditory information to aid remembering, thus providing a realistic analogue of everyday life. In fact, West and Crook

-333-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Basic and Applied Memory Research: Practical Applications - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 502

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.