Basic and Applied Memory Research: Practical Applications - Vol. 2

By Douglas J. Herrmann; Cathy McEvoy et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWENTY-FIVE Automation of Flight Data in Air Traffic Control

O. U. Vortac
Ami L. Barile
Chris A. Albright
Todd R. Truitt
University of Oklahoma

Carol A. Manning
Federal Aviation Administration Civil Aeromedical Institute

Dana Bain
Federal Aviation Administration Academy

Every day, the airspace of the United States accommodates hundreds of thousands of aircraft movements. Some 70% of all flights occur under instrument flight rules and are thus handled by the nation's air traffic control (ATC) system. Currently, a major ATC center may handle as many as 7,000 flights a day, the majority of them jetliners traveling at airspeeds in excess of 450 knots. The responsibility for the separation of these flights rests with individuals or small teams of controllers, each assigned a volume of airspace, a sector. The controller manages the sector using technologies that, given the traffic loads and the rapid evolution of in-flight avionics, appear anachronistic. For example, some important data pertaining to a flight are currently recorded on small strips of paper, known as flight progress strips (FPSs), whose format and function have changed little since they were introduced in the 1930s and 1940s.

The FPS augments the primary flight information displayed on the computer-enhanced radar: The radar screen shows the position of each aircraft in the sector together with a representation of sector boundaries and other landmarks. Each aircraft is shown together with its call sign, altitude, and a limited choice of other information. Additional flight data, such as planned route, time of arrival, assigned altitude, type of aircraft, and so on, are printed on the FPS that is associated with each flight and that is posted in a "bay"

-353-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Basic and Applied Memory Research: Practical Applications - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 502

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.