Thinking across Cultures

By Donald M. Topping; Doris C. Crowell et al. | Go to book overview

6
On the Learning and Thinking Styles of Hawaiian Children

Gisela E. Speidel Dale C. Farran Cathie Jordan Center for Development of Early Education and the University of Hawaii

How man comes to know and learn about the world around him has intrigued us since the ancient philosophers Plato and Aristotle. That people and cultures differ in their styles of thinking and learning has been the subject of much speculation: Analytic vs. holistic ( Bretherton, McNew, Snyder, & Bates, 1983), sequential vs. simultaneous ( Das, Kirby, & Jarman, 1979; Kaufman & Kaufman , 1983), serial vs. holistic ( Pask & Scott, 1972), word vs. picture ( Levin, Devine-Hawkins, Kerst, & Guttmann, 1974), verbal vs. nonverbal ( Paivio, 1974), field dependent vs. field-independent ( Witkin & Berry, 1975; Witkin, Dyk, Faterson, Goodenough, & Karp, 1962), have been ways dichotomizing the working styles of the human mind. The theories are at times elaborate (e.g., Witkin et al., 1962), while the evidence is weak. However, if there are such different learning/thinking styles of the mind, the educational ramifications could be far reaching. Would not tailoring the instruction to processing or learning styles facilitate learning? If some children, for instance, are better visual processors than auditory processors would changes in reading instruction, tailored to each style result in learning to read more readily? Should one not have different curricula for children with different styles of thinking, either building upon their strengths or strengthening their weaknesses?

Highly developed visual and observational skills have been observed in North American Indians (e.g., John, 1972) and in Eskimos ( Kleinfeld, 1971). It has often been suggested that American Indians have a preference for that which Cazden and John ( 1971) called "learning by looking," and that this learning differs from the conventional, predominantly verbal traditional school style of learning. Native Hawaiians, too, may be operating in what Jordan, Tharp, and Vogt ( 1986) have called an "observational learning complex." We find hints that such may be the case in ethnographic reports of "contextual"

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Thinking across Cultures
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 506

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.