Thinking across Cultures

By Donald M. Topping; Doris C. Crowell et al. | Go to book overview
1. how is knowledge acquired;
2. what prior knowledge might a system require in order to be able to bootstrap itself into a position of being able to acquire knowledge;
3. what general processes of reasoning (or heuristics) might a system employ in the acquisition of knowledge;
4. in what way can norms be determined in the area of knowledge acquisition and how might deviance from these norms be recognized.

As researchers in AI work to find solutions to these problems, they might usefully turn for a source of inspiration to studies of problematic cases such as the one described here. At the same time, any results in AI could well be suggestive for those working in the area of pathology.


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

This paper was written while the author was Visiting Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics, University of Hawaii, and recipient of a Fulbright Travel Grant. These sources of support are gratefully acknowledged.


REFERENCES

Baron-Cohen S., Leslie. A. M., & Frith U. ( 1985). "Does the autistic child have a theory of mind?" Cognition, 21, 37-46.

Johnson-Laird P. ( 1983). Mental models. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

McTear M. ( 1985a). "Pragmatic disorders: A question of direction". British Journal of Disorders of Communication, 20, 119-127.

McTear M. ( 1985b). "Pragmatic disorders: A case study of conversational disability". British Journal of Disorders of Communication, 20, 129-141.

Rapin I., & Allen D. ( 1983). "Developmental language disorders". In U. Kirk (Ed.), Neuro- psychology of language, reading and spelling. New York: Academic Press.

Schank R. ( 1986). Explanation patterns: Understanding mechanically and creatively. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Scribner S. ( 1979). "Modes of thinking and ways of speaking: Culture and logic revisited". In R. Freedle (Ed.), New directions in discourse processing. Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Sperber D., & Wilson D. ( 1986). Relevance: Communication and cognition. Oxford: Blackwell.

Stubbs M. ( 1983). Discourse analysis. Oxford: Blackwell.

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