Thinking across Cultures

By Donald M. Topping; Doris C. Crowell et al. | Go to book overview

3
Making the Horse Drink: An "Engineering" Ideology Underlying U.S. Education

D. N. Perkins Harvard Graduate School of Education

The purposes of education are several but widely agreed upon. We educate our young to acquaint them with the past and prepare them for the present. We aim to build a sense of culture and a set of skills. We want a citizenry that can read, write, and make reasonable decisions. We want individuals prepared to follow professions for which they show some flair and liking. While differences in emphasis mark different cultural contexts, the broad mission is much the same around the world.

It is possible to pursue the educational objectives listed through quite different instructional ideologies. One such ideology is an "engineering" perspective on education commonplace in U.S. culture today, both in school practice and in educational research. The general spirit of this ideology is that we can make students learn if only we design the educational experience with sufficient care. If our methods accord with the research, our texts are well-crafted, the tasks we pose sensitive to developmental level, learning will follow inexorably. The saying goes that one can lead a horse to water, but not make him drink. An engineering perspective on education takes a more optimistic view: We can lead the horse to water, and, by being clever enough, make him drink too.


IS THIS ENGINEERING IDEOLOGY REAL AND DISTINCTIVE?

We should not jump hastily to the conclusions that this engineering ideology exists or constrasts with other educational ideologies in U.S. and other cultures. Yet it is not hard to build a case for both the reality and the distinctiveness of such an ideology.

-389-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Thinking across Cultures
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 506

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.