The Future's Back: Nuclear Rivalry, Deterrence Theory, and Crisis Stability after the Cold War

By Frank P. Harvey | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION
1
The title is a variation of Mearsheimer article "Back to the Future" in International Security ( 1990a). Mearsheimer proposed reviewing theories as a basis for predicting the stability of post-Cold War Europe. However, he dealt exclusively with hypotheses related to the changing nature of polarity in Europe, while the present investigation goes well beyond this by developing a more comprehensive approach to the cumulation of crisis-management theory.
2
Kuhn ( 1970) questioned the true scope of cumulation in the natural sciences as well, an issue to be discussed in more detail later in chapter I.
3
The author's contribution to collaborative work has been used in chapters 3 and 5 of this project ( Harvey and James 1992; James and Harvey 1992).

CHAPTER ONE
1
Some observers have pointed to the expansion of the field as yet another explanation for the lack of integrative cumulation in IR. Writing almost thirty years ago, Platig observed that developments in IR "may have outrun the capability of any one person to evaluate [progress] . . . in adequate depth" (1966, 182). If this was not an accurate assessment of the complexity of the discipline then, it certainly is true today. In addition to the diversity of professional tasks, intellectual approaches, and research objectives (for example, historical, theoretical, methodological,

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