The Soviet Administrative Elite

By Kenneth C. Farmer | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Alexis de Tocqueville, The Old Regime and the French Revolution, trans. Stuart Gilbert ( Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1955), p. 177.
2.
Alexander Yanov, The Russian Challenge and the Year 2000, trans. Iden J. Rosenthal ( Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1987), p. 7.
3.
On "developed socialism," see Donald R. Kelley, The Politics of Developed Socialism: The Soviet Union as a Post-Industrial State (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1986).
4.
For critical discussions of "stability of cadres," see Gail Warshofsky Lapidus , "The Brezhnev Generation and Directed Social Change: Depoliticization as a Political Strategy," in Alexander Dallin, ed., The 25th Congress of the CPSU: Assessment and Context ( Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 1977); and R. Judson Mitchell , "Immobilism, Depoliticization, and the Emerging Soviet Elite." Orbis 26, no. 4 (Fall 1982):591-609.
5.
This is a ritual practice in Soviet politics: Because policy is so inextricably tied to personalities, new leaders must pave the way for new policies by discrediting their predecessors. Tongue no doubt in cheek, Aleksandr Yakovlev called the Brezhnev period the "era of universal enchantment." A. N. Yakoviev, "Dostizhenie kachestvenno novogo sostoianiia sovetskogo obshchestva i obshchestvennie nauki," Vestnik Akademii Nauk SSSR, no. 6 ( 1987):53. With similar dry humor, M. A. Ulianov referred at the Nineteenth Party Conference to the Stalin, Khrushchev, and Brezhnev periods respectively as the era of the cult, the era of voluntarism, and the era of stagnation. Current Soviet Policies ( Columbus, OH: Current Digest of the Soviet Press, 1990), p. 42. Future pundits may call the Gorbachev period the era of disappointment.
6.
Jerry F. Hough, "The Brezhnev Era: The Man and the System," Problems of Communism 25, no. 2 ( March-April 1976): p. 1.
7.
See Grey Hodnett, "Succession Contingencies in the Soviet Union," Problems of Communism, no. 24 ( 1975):1-21.
8.
Ilya Zemtsov, Chernenko: The Last Bolshevik ( New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 1989), pp. vii-ix. This book abounds with errors, such as the assertion that Gorbachev headed the Novosibirsk Party organization in the 1970s: p. xv.
9.
However, Zhores Medvedev writes that Kunaev and Shcherbitskii balked at working under someone they considered their junior. Andropov ( New York: Penguin Books, 1984), p. 11.
10.
Baruch A. Hazen, From Brezhnev to Gorbachev: Infighting in the Kremlin ( Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1987), p. 29.
11.
Myron Rush, "Succeeding Brezhnev," Problems of Communism 32, no. 1 ( January-February 1983):3.
12.
Viktor Goliavkin, "Iubileinaia rech," Avrora ( Leningrad), December 1981.
13.
New York Times, February 22, 1982. On Buriatia, see the journalistic account by Stanley Lauden in Galina Brezhnev and Her Gypsy Lover ( London: Quartet Books, 1989).
14.
Jonathan Steele and Eric Abraham, Andropov in Power: From Komsomol to Kremlin ( Garden City, NY: Anchor Press/Doubleday, 1984), p. 142. The story is

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The Soviet Administrative Elite
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures ix
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter 1- Introduction: The Theoretical Context 1
  • Notes 25
  • Chapter 2- Educating the Elite 31
  • Notes 66
  • Chapter 3- Elite Structure 73
  • Notes 96
  • Chapter 4- The Stalinist Transformation 101
  • Notes 140
  • Chapter 5- Elite-Society Relations 149
  • Notes 180
  • Chapter 6- Elite Recruitment and Mobility 189
  • Notes 220
  • Chapter 7 - Venality 225
  • Notes 245
  • Chapter 8- Iron Teeth: The Gorbachev Transformation 251
  • Notes 280
  • Selected Bibliography 285
  • Index 291
  • About the Author 297
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