Railroads, the Free Enterprise Alternative

By Daniel L. Overbey | Go to book overview

7
ASPECTS OF JOINT USE

Under the traditional structure, each railroad company functions as an independent entity, providing its own fixed way and its own carrier services. Unlike the other modes' carriers which routinely share fixed ways, railroad companies do not usually engage in joint use of fixed ways. The categories of joint use which are found in the railroad industry play an important role as examples showing the feasibility of joint use and the limitations imposed on it by the traditional structure.

Railroad companies enter into certain types of joint operations in which two or more railroads coordinate train service, with each railroad retaining exclusive use of its own tracks. These operations allow railroad companies to integrate independent carrier services to a limited extent. Even though corporate boundaries are respected, coordinated operations indicate the degree of standardization achieved in the railroad industry. In recent years, the Federal Railroad Administration has implemented standards and policies which further encourage standardization and joint use.


JOINT USE

Unlike the other modes which routinely share fixed ways, joint use of trackage plays a minor role in the railroad industry. Joint ownership and trackage rights are two means for sharing track.


Joint Ownership

During previous eras of railroad construction, two competing railroads occasionally compromised and built a jointly owned railroad. In other cases, two or more railroads purchased another railroad to guarantee themselves a "friendly" connection. Owner railroads might share the joint line's trackage, as was often done with terminal railroads serving large cities. In many instances, however, the jointly owned railroad company maintained exclusive use of its own tracks, and even its owners had to interchange cars moving over the joint line.

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Railroads, the Free Enterprise Alternative
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • New Titles From Quorum Books ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Figures xi
  • Tables xiii
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • 1 - Development of The Railway 3
  • Notes 6
  • 2 - A Product of Necessity 9
  • Notes 13
  • 3 - Degrees Of Standardization 15
  • Notes 18
  • 4 - Changing Times, 4 Changing Needs 19
  • Notes 31
  • Appendix To Chapter 4 Tables 1-4 33
  • 5 - For Everyone Else: The Typical Transportation Industry Structure 41
  • Notes 53
  • 6 - Railroad Industry Structure 55
  • Notes 65
  • 7 - Aspects of Joint Use 67
  • Notes 73
  • 8 - Aspects of Innovation 75
  • Notes 87
  • 9: Economics And Structure 91
  • Appendix To Chapter 9 109
  • 10 - In Theory, in Congress 113
  • Notes 124
  • 11 - A Proposal 127
  • 12 - Roadway Companies 131
  • 13 - Carrier Companies 147
  • Notes 161
  • 14 - Terminals 163
  • 15 - Regulation 173
  • Notes 181
  • 16 - Opportunity For Innovation 183
  • Notes 192
  • Appendix To Chapter 16 Service Alternatives For Short-Haul Traffic 195
  • 17 - The Promise And The Prospects 199
  • Notes 204
  • 18 - A Logical Conclusion 207
  • Notes 210
  • Bibliography 211
  • Index 221
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