The Problem of Democracy in Latin America

By Martin C. Needler | Go to book overview

6
Revolutionary Regimes
and the Case of Mexico

The classic revolutionary regime—that is, a regime which has come to power by victory in civil war and intends to change basic structures so as to redistribute wealth and income—by its nature exhibits certain specific characteristics and evolves within a limited range of possibilities. On the one hand, it is freed from institutional constraints, not being bound by requirements for legislative majorities, for judicial review, or for conformity with preexisting legal and administrative practices. Having defeated the traditional armed forces, it need not worry in the short run about the threat of a palace coup promoted by the social classes disadvantaged by the regime's policies. On the other hand, its economic situation is necessarily precarious. Businessmen are at the least suspicious and cautious, perhaps even in headlong flight. The new administrators of the economy suffer from inexperience, ignorance, and counterproductive prejudices. The regional hegemonic power and principal trading partner is either suspicious and uncooperative or downright hostile. These starkly contrasting strengths and disadvantages condition the development of the regime as it struggles to survive and prosper.

Many Latin American countries have experienced revolutionary regimes in recent history.A revolutionary government took power in Bolivia in 1952. The Peronist government in Argentina ( 1946-1955) showed some traits associated with revolutionary governments, as did the government of Salvador Allende in Chile ( 1970-1973). The government of Jacobo Arbenz in Guatemala ( 1950-1954) and that of Juan Velasco Alvarado in Peru ( 1968-1975), similarly, displayed some revolutionary characteristics.The surviving revolutionary regimes in Latin America at the time of writing, however, are those of Mexico, Cuba, and Nicaragua.All of these took power after armed struggle in which the traditional armed forces were defeated. We will examine first the case of Mexico, which has the oldest revolutionary regime still extant.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Problem of Democracy in Latin America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Problem of Democracy in Latin America *
  • Contents *
  • Figure and Tables *
  • Preface *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • 1: Premises and Preconceptions *
  • 2: The Latin American Tradition *
  • 3: Change and Development *
  • 4: The Hegemonic Factor *
  • 5: The State *
  • 6: Revolutionary Regimes and the Case of Mexico *
  • 7: The Politics of Coffee *
  • 8: External Dependence *
  • 9: Regionalism in Plural Societies *
  • 10: Echoes of Europe *
  • 11: The Colossus of the South *
  • 12: Conclusion *
  • Notes *
  • Bibliography *
  • Index *
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 190

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.