The Slave's Narrative

By Charles T. Davis; Henry Louis Gates Jr. | Go to book overview

and mother, and sisters, and the Christian names by which they had known them, but their own family name soon faded from their memory— their only names as slaves were Peter and Levin.They soon learned to breathe only to each other the fact that they were born free. They submitted to their dreadful lot; they were cheerful, obedient, honest; and a superficial observer—base enough to forget that of all wrongs—might have pronounced them happy. They formed such ties as are possible to slaves; each as he became a man learned to love with the affection of a husband a wife who may be torn from him at an owner's caprice or convenience. Children were born to them—children that were the property of other men. Levin died in the house of bondage.Peter at last—having passed into the ownership of a humane Jew, who had not the full benefit of that Christianity which we are urgently invited to "aid" at the South— was allowed to purchase his freedom.Returning to Philadelphia, after an absence of forty years, the good providence of God so guided his steps that he found his aged mother and the surviving members of his family.Then begging from door to door, he accumulated slowly the gifts of human sympathy which at last enabled him to buy his wife and children. And here in this volume, we have the whole story, with its marvelous and touching details.

New Englander, Vol. 14, No. LVI ( Nov. 1856), 628-29.


Linda: Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl
Written by Herself

Edited by Lydia Maria Child. Boston: Published for the Author. 1861.

ANONYMOUS

We have read this book with no ordinary interest, for we are acquainted with the writer; we have heard many of the incidents from her own lips, and have great confidence in her truthfulness and integrity. Between two and three years ago, a coloured woman, about as dark as a southern Spaniard or a Portuguese, aged about five-and-forty, and with a kind

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