The Slave's Narrative

By Charles T. Davis; Henry Louis Gates Jr. | Go to book overview
Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African wrote, in The General Magazine and Impartial Review (July 1789), "This is 'a round unvarnished tale' of the chequered adventures of an African ...." (see appendix to vol.I of The Life of Olaudah Equiano, ed. Paul Edwards [ London: Dawsons of Pall Mall, 1969].

John Greenleaf Whittier, though stung once in his sponsorship of James Williams' Narrative, did not shrink from a second, similar venture, writing, in his "introductory note" to the Autobiography of the Rev.Josiah Henson (Mrs. Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Uncle Tom")—also known as Uncle Tom's Story of His Life From 1789 to 1879—"'The early life of the author, as a slave, ... proves that in the terrible pictures of 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' there is 'nothing extenuate or aught set down in malice'" ( Boston: B. B. Russell & Co., 1879, p. viii).

19.
Quoted by Philip S. Foner in the introduction to My Bondage and My Freedom, pp. xi-xii.
20.
Both quotations from Benjamin Quarles, " The Breach Between Douglass and Garrison," Journal of Negro History, XXIII ( April 1938), p. 147, note 19, and p. 154.
21.
The list is from Nichols' unpublished doctoral dissertation ( Brown University, 1948), " A Study of the Slave Narrative," p. 9.
22.
Black Boy: A Record of Childhood and Youth ( New York, 1966), p. 282.

Three West African Writers of the 1780s

PAUL EDWARDS

During the eighteenth century a considerable number of Africans in Britain became literate in English.In some cases they had come to Britain to receive special training, but they were usually household servants, and most of them either were, or had been, slaves.Some competence in written and spoken English was needed to enable them to carry out their household duties, and occasional teaching was sometimes provided, as recorded in this item from a contemporary book of accounts:

By paid James McKenzie, Schoolmaster of Huntly for Teaching the Black Boy Harry per Receipt Nine shillings sterling Due from the 5th of November 1760 to the first of February 1761, and from the 11th of May 1761 to the 27th of July 1762.1

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Slave's Narrative
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 342

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.