muscularity" of contemporary American fictional style and to praise Updike as the exception.
14.
Walter Sullivan, " Updike, Spark and Others," Sewanee Review, 74 ( Summer 1966), especially pp. 711-713; and Joseph Epstein, " Mother's Day on the Updike Farm," New Republic, 11 December 1965, pp. 23-26. With fine humor, Epstein thanks Updike for the character of Mrs. Robinson: "If it accomplishes nothing else, Updike's creation of the mother in Of the Farm provides a tremendous service for Jewish mothers everywhere.In effect, it lets them off the hook.... Next to Updike's creation, the mother in Bruce Jay Friedman's novel, A Mother's Kisses, for example, seems like a favorite aunt."
15.
Peter Buitenhuis, " The Mowing of a Meadow," New York Times Book Review, 14 November 1965, pp. 4, 34; Charles Thomas Samuels, " The Question of Updike."
16.
The generally lukewarm response in the British press is illustrated by Robert Taubman's complaint: "Switching from mythology, Updike has contrived a neo-classical tragedy.As before, the point is very largely in the contrivance, and it satisfies so long as nothing else is asked of it. The dazzling exchanges between Joey, his mother and the new wife are best enjoyed for themselves alone.To look for more can hardly fail to raise doubts." See " Updike," New Statesman, 12 August 1966, p. 233.
17.
On the Dick Cavett Show for 15 December 1978, Updike revealed that he often wrote the material for the dust jackets of his books.
18.
See Updike's poem " Leaving Church Early," Tossing and Turning ( New York: Knopf, 1977).
19.
See Updike's short story "The Bulgarian Poetess" in which he expresses a similar idea: "We fall in love, I tried to say in the book, with women who remind us of our first landscape."" The Bulgarian Poetess," The Music School ( New York: Knopf, 1966), p. 229.
20.
Compare Updike's short story " Should Wizard Hit Mommy?," Pigeon Feathers ( New York: Knopf, 1962).
21.
For a similar view, see the following comment by Wesley Kort: "The presence of those remembered lives forms the answer to death which the minister in this book refers to as 'the concrete reality of Christ.' For the point at which religion and art join in Updike's work is where these portraits of recall move out to that all-important resurrected presence, and the art becomes a sacrament."; " A Confession of Debt," The Christian Century, 19 January 1966, p. 82.
22.
But see Buitenhuis who argues that the tension is resolved affirmatively.
23.
Samuels, John Updike, p. 154. See also Updike's introduction to what was to have been the Czech edition of Of the Farm, Picked-Up Pieces ( New York: Knopf, 1975), pp. 82-83: "The underlying thematic transaction, as I conceived it, was the mutual forgiveness of mother and son, the acceptance each of the other's guilt in taking what they had wanted, to the discomfort, respectively, of the dead father and the divorced wife."

-140-

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John Updike's Novels
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • John Updike's Novels *
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • Preface ix
  • Created Landscapes - The Poorhouse Fair (1959) the Coup (1978) *
  • The Poorhouse Fair *
  • The Coup 28
  • Why Rabbit Should Keep on Running - Rabbit, Run (1960) Rabbit Redux (1971) Rabbit Is Rich (1981) *
  • Rabbit, Run *
  • Rabbit Redux 64
  • Rabbit Is Rich 84
  • Home - The Centaur (1963) of the Farm (1965) 100
  • The Centaur *
  • Of the Farm 121
  • Faltering toward Divorce - Couples (1968) a Month of Sundays (1975) Marry Me: a Romance (1976) 140
  • Couples *
  • A Month of Sundays 163
  • Marry Me: A Romance 184
  • Bech: A Conclusion - Bech: a Book 200
  • Bech: A Book *
  • Selected Checklist of John Updike's Novels 212
  • Index 217
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