The Paradox of Change: American Women in the 20th Century

By William H. Chafe | Go to book overview

Bibliographical Essay

THE ORIGINAL EDITION of The American Woman, of which the present volume is a substantial revision, contains a complete set of footnotes.These are omitted here primarily because many of the citations in the 1972 edition were to government archives, such us the Women's Bureau Papers, that subsequently have been moved to a new location and thoroughly reclassified. (They are now at the National Archives and appear in a dramatically different form and arrangement from when I saw them—in dusty, uncatalogued cartons—at the Federal Record Center in Suitland, Maryland, during the years from 1968 to 1971.) Since it was virtually impossible to relocate the old material in its new setting, I regretfully decided to substitute a bibliographical essay for the original footnotes.For those sections that have not been altered, the former notes may remain useful. I have also appended a complete list of the manuscript collections used in both books. What follows is a selective discussion of the books and articles most relevant to the issues discussed in the new volume. As much as possible, the bibliographical essay follows the narrative progression of the new book.

For those interested in a general survey of women's history in America, the best place to begin is with a series of overviews.The most recent and up‐ to-date is Sara Evans, Born for Liberty: A History of Women in America ( New York, 1989). Other texts include Nancy Woloch, Women and the American Experience ( New York, 1984), and Mary Ryan, Womanhood in America: From Colonial Times to the Present ( New York, 1979). On the twentieth century, see Lois Banner, Women in the Modern World ( New York, 1975). Anthologies that contain material on this entire history include those by Nancy Hewitt, Women, Families and Communities: Readings in American History, two volumes, ( Chicago, 1989)

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