The Class Struggles in France, 1848-1850

By Karl Marx | Go to book overview

IV
THE ABOLITION OF UNIVERSAL SUFFRAGE) 1850

(From Double Number V and VI)

(The continuation of the three foregoing chapters is found in the Revue in the fifth and sixth double number of the Neue Rhenische Zeitung, the last to appear. There, after the great commercial crisis that broke out in England in 1847 had first been described and the coming of the political complications on the European Continent to a head in the revolutions of February and March 1848 had been explained by its reactions there, it is then shown how the prosperity of trade and industry, that again set in during the course of 1848 and increased still further in 1849, paralyzed the revolutionary upsurge and made possible the simultaneous victories of the reaction. With special reference to France, it is then said:)*

The same symptoms showed themselves in France since 1849 and particularly since the beginning of 1850. The Parisian industries are abundantly employed and the cotton factories of Rouen and Mülhausen are also doing pretty well, although here, as in England, the high prices of the raw material have exercised a retarding influence. The development of prosperity in France was, in addition, especially advanced by the comprehensive tariff reform in Spain and by the reduction of the duties on various luxury articles in Mexico; the export of French commodities to both markets has considerably increased. The growth of capital in France led to a series of speculations, for which the exploitation of the Californian gold mines on a large scale served as a pretext. A swarm of companies sprang up, the low denomination of whose shares and whose socialist-colored prospectuses appeal directly to the purses of the petty bourgeois and

____________________
*
Introductory note by Frederick Engels.

-132-

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The Class Struggles in France, 1848-1850
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Editor's Note 5
  • Contents 7
  • Introduction 9
  • I - From February to June 1848 33
  • II - From June 1848 to June 13, 1849 60
  • III - From June 13, 1849, to March 10, 1850 95
  • IV - The Abolition of Universal Suffrage) 1850 132
  • Explanatory Notes 151
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