Proceedings of CSCL '97: The Second International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning, December 10-14, 1997, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

By Rogers Hall; Naomi Miyake et al. | Go to book overview

Roles of a Case Library as a Collaborative Tool for Fostering Argumentation

Janet L. Kolodner*, Baruch Schwarz**, Reuma DeGroot Barkai**, Edith Levy- Neumand **, Anna Tcherni**, and Anat Turbovsky**

*Edutech Institude, College of Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology

**School of Education, Hebrew University


Abstract

We tried to create an environment conducive to learning argumentation skills by combining collaborative use of case libraries with teacher facilitation of an appropriate kind. We present here the way we designed the environment, including the case library we created and the role of the teacher. The role of the case library in facilitating both collaboration and construction and evaluation of arguments is analyzed through examples. While preliminary, our analysis suggests (i) several principles for designing a case library as an invitation to interpretation and (ii) that integration of such a tool into the classroom provides a viable way of supporting creation of better arguments, learning of argumentation norms, and conflict resolution and negotiations among students.

Keywords --argumentation, case-based reasoning, case library, middle school, tools to support collaborative learning


1.0 Introduction

Informal reasoning involves generating or evaluating (or both) evidence pertaining to a claim or conclusion. It is most useful when information that is available doesn't point toward a single consistent conclusion ( Means & Voss, 1996), and at its core is the generation and evaluation of arguments. Educating students to argue well is essential (e.g., Voss, Perkins & Segal, 1991). But setting up a learning environment well to facilitate such learning is difficult. If a teacher intercedes too much, for example, his biases are interjected into student arguments, or alternatively, his intercessions are seen by students as prescriptions for what they need to do - - the opposite of what needs to be taught.

We tried to create an environment conducive to learning argumentation skills by combining collaborative use of case libraries with teacher facilitation of an appropriate kind. We present here the way we designed such an environment, including the case library we created and the role of the teacher. The role of the case library in facilitating both collaboration and construction and evaluation of arguments is analyzed through examples. While preliminary, our analysis suggests (i) principles for designing a case library as an invitation to interpretation and (ii) that integration of such a tool into the classroom provides a viable way to scaffold creation of better arguments, learning of argumentation norms, and conflict resolution and negotiations among students.


2.0 Education to Argumentation

It seems reasonable to hypothesize that argumentation skills will best be cultivated in a collaborative educational setting, one in which students have a chance to hear expert arguments and analyze them for their essential features, engage in argumentation on a regular basis, and critique their arguments, gradually learning the skills required. But educating for good argumentation skills cannot easily adopt any of the popular educational models based on an asymmetric relation expert-novice relation between teacher and student (e.g., cognitive apprenticeship ( Collins, Brown & Newman, 1989)). One reason is that modeling argumentation requires exemplary discussion between two or more expert arguers. It can hardly be modeled by one person. Second, a scaffolding-like stage is difficult to adapt from those models. Any authoritarian intervention modifies argumentation in a way that may be lethal for it, because authority biases debates. Moreover, the teacher needs to intervene very cautiously, taking into account the current arguments of the participants and a plan for modifying their argumentation without impairing engagement. Finally, prompting during argumentative talk moves the talk to an adult-

-150-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Proceedings of CSCL '97: The Second International Conference on Computer Support for Collaborative Learning, December 10-14, 1997, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.