Painting of the Golden Age: A Biographical Dictionary of Seventeenth-Century European Painters

By Adelheid M. Gealt | Go to book overview

V

VACCARO, Andrea ( Naples 1605-1670), Italian. One of the more academically inclined painters active in Naples during the second half of the century, Vaccaro looked to Guido Reni* and van Dyck* as well as Massimo Stanzione* in the formulation of his numerous portrayals of saints and holy figures. Despite or perhaps because of a certain restraint in his work, Vaccaro maintained a sufficiently high quality in his paintings to be ranked among the significant Neapolitan painters active during the second half of the seventeenth century.

Vaccaro first trained with Girolamo Imparato and then with Carlo Sellito* and Caracciolo.* He married Lucrezia d'Ambrosio, and they baptized a daughter in 1628. His activity is recorded from 1636 to 1670, when it is presumed he died. Vaccaro helped found the earliest Neapolitan "academy," the Fraternity of SS. Anna e Luca dei Pittori in 1665, and served as its rector until his death.

His early phase includes copies from Caravaggio* ( Flagellation in S. Domenico; the copy is in the same church) and Ribera* ( St. Anthony of Padua, for the Sacristy of S. Ferdinando in Naples, now in Madrid). His independent paintings, such as the St. Sebastian of Naples, Capodimonte, demonstrate his careful studies from models, his vigorous draughtsmanship, and his response to Reni.

Vaccaro's finest period is often called the decade between 1635 and 1645. At this time Bernardo Cavallino's* influence added a certain delicacy to his work, as shown in his Death of St. Joseph ( Naples, S. Maria del

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Painting of the Golden Age: A Biographical Dictionary of Seventeenth-Century European Painters
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface And Acknowledgments ix
  • List of Artists xv
  • A 1
  • B 12
  • C 80
  • D 167
  • E 194
  • F 202
  • G 221
  • H 253
  • J 290
  • K 298
  • L 310
  • M 355
  • N 407
  • O 416
  • P 424
  • R 466
  • S 524
  • T 580
  • U 593
  • V 596
  • W 638
  • Z 652
  • Appendix: - Artists by Nationality 661
  • Museum Abbreviations 673
  • Bibliography 681
  • Index 743
  • About the Author 771
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