Painting of the Golden Age: A Biographical Dictionary of Seventeenth-Century European Painters

By Adelheid M. Gealt | Go to book overview

W

WEENIX Jan ( Amsterdam 1642- 1719), Dutch. A virtuoso painter of still lifes featuring dead game, Jan Weenix pined admirers throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries for his beautifully rendered hares, partridges, and other animals. Goethe and Reynolds both praised him while his influence can be found in the paintings of Jean Baptiste Chardin, Jean Baptiste Oudry, Alexandre Desportes, and Gustave Courbet.

Jan was the son and pupil of the landscape and genre painter Jan Baptist Weenix* ( 1621-1660/1); his birthdate is most often cited as 1642, although some sources say 1640. Jan moved with his father to Utrecht in 1648 and was listed as a member of its guild from 1664 until 1668. The following year he must have moved to Amsterdam, where he married in 1679. He remained there for the rest of his life. During his early period Jan imitated his father's Italianate landscapes, which featured genre figures (see, for example, his Merry Company, dated 1667, Paris, Musée du Petit Palais). However, during the early 1680s (or around the time he moved to Amsterdam) he shifted toward still lifes with dead game (e.g., Still Life with Dead Hare, signed and dated 1682/3, Karlsruhe, Staatliche Kunsthalle), working sufficiently close to his father's manner that the two artists are sometimes confused. Jan's consummate skill at handling the various textures of fur, feathers, velvet, and marble, as well as his decorative compositional skill, is beautifully demonstrated in Hunting Piece on Marble Table (dated 1680/5, Vaduz, Liechtensteinische Kunstsammlung).

Between 1702 and 1714, working for the Elector Palatine Johan Wilhelm in Düsseldorf and Bensberg, Jan produced his most ambitious game

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Painting of the Golden Age: A Biographical Dictionary of Seventeenth-Century European Painters
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface And Acknowledgments ix
  • List of Artists xv
  • A 1
  • B 12
  • C 80
  • D 167
  • E 194
  • F 202
  • G 221
  • H 253
  • J 290
  • K 298
  • L 310
  • M 355
  • N 407
  • O 416
  • P 424
  • R 466
  • S 524
  • T 580
  • U 593
  • V 596
  • W 638
  • Z 652
  • Appendix: - Artists by Nationality 661
  • Museum Abbreviations 673
  • Bibliography 681
  • Index 743
  • About the Author 771
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