Assessing Basic Academic Skills in Higher Education: The Texas Approach

By Richard T. Alpert; William Phillip Gorth et al. | Go to book overview

Balancing State Initiative and Campus Participation in Texas

Joan M. Matthews and Richard T. Alpert

On college campuses across the country, graduation ceremonies are remarkably similar. Despite the great variety of degrees and institutions, the graduates are welcomed into the "company of educated men and women." However, in all too many cases, these words have a hollow ring. Although they are college graduates, many fall short of having even the most fundamental skills that we associate with a college education.


Basic Skills Issues on the, National Agenda

The issue of students lacking the basic skills generally associated with college-level work has gained a prominent place on the national educational agenda. We cannot attribute this attention simply to the popularity of such books as Allan Bloom The Closing of the American Mind ( 1987) or E. D. Hirsch Cultural Literacy ( 1987). Rather, it grows out of the everyday experiences of more and more faculty in almost every kind of institution in American higher education. Too many students simply lack the reading, mathematics, and writing skills they need in order to perform effectively in college courses. Although a number of factors may contribute to this decline--the impact of television, a decrease in parents' involvement in their children's education, the organization of curricular materials, changes in the populations entering college--colleges and universities must nevertheless face the challenges of educating underprepared students and must try to compensate for the decline.

____________________
Richard T. Alpert is division director of higher education programs at National Evaluation Systems, Inc.
Joan M. Matthews is a director of the Texas Academic Skills Program of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Assessing Basic Academic Skills in Higher Education: The Texas Approach
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 278

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.