Pride and Prejudice: School Desegregation and Urban Renewal in Norfolk, 1950-1959

By Forrest R. White | Go to book overview

Introduction

The twin waves of boom and bust had broken many times upon Norfolk's shores. Bombarded, blockaded, captured, and even plundered, the city had endured its share of misfortune at the hands of invaders; but Norfolk, too, had suffered even more mercilessly from enemies within, having been razed by the patriots, isolated by trade restrictions, strangled by intrastate rivalries, decimated by yellow fever, terrorized by the armed mobs during Reconstruction, and then very nearly ruined financially by the disarmament that followed World War I. Through it all, however, the promise of prosperity lingered just around the corner. For more than 300 years the ships of many nations had sought refuge in her fine natural harbor. For two centuries the hammer blows of the ship-building trade had reverberated across her waterfront, punctuating the bustle of ships' chandlers, sail makers, jacktars, tavern keepers, and sailors on leave. Merchants, upon surveying this hubbub of activity, dreamed of the day when the harbor would one day compete with the great ports of New York, Baltimore, Boston, and Charleston. It was the pursuit of this dream that brought them the resiliency to overcome the harrowing scars of defeat. Over and over Norfolk again had bounced back from the crushing blows of

-xi-

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Pride and Prejudice: School Desegregation and Urban Renewal in Norfolk, 1950-1959
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Prologue: Norfolk Before 1950 xix
  • 1- Planning the New Norfolk xxvii
  • 2- Premonitions of Crisis 35
  • 3- First Reactions to Brown 57
  • 4- The Bulldozer Era 85
  • 5- Redevelopment Rationales 121
  • 6- Prelude to Confrontation 151
  • 7- In Pursuit of a Mandate 175
  • 8- A Very Massive Resister 199
  • 9- A Second School Crisis 231
  • 10- Conclusion 245
  • Abbreviations 301
  • Glossary 303
  • Bibliography 309
  • Index 337
  • About the Author 345
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