Intersections with Attachment

By Jacob L. Gewirtz; William M. Kurtines | Go to book overview

Thus, they may be "off-mother" a great deal of the time when mother is rejecting, but their ability to cope with their extra-dyadic environment is not enhanced at all. The appearance of independence or reduced attachment is illusory. The infant who, on the other hand, is permitted to modulate its behavior in terms of its own affective state, moving away when relaxed or comfortable, returning at will to the reassuring contact of the "available" and "contingently responsive" mother (cf. Lewis & Goldberg, 1968), is likely to be in a state better suited to learning the complexities of coping with its social and physical world. Hence, it is the more permissive but responsive mother who facilitates the ultimate reduction of attachment that is necessary for her offspring to cope effectively with its social and physical world even in her absence.


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

The research reported in this paper was supported in part by USPHS Grant #MH15970, funds from the H. F. Guggenheim Foundation, and the State University of New York.


REFERENCES

Alpert Stephanie. ( 1978). The response of infant monkeys to mothers, familiars, strangers and peers: Development during the first 8 months of life. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, SUNY Downstate Medical Center.

Altmann S. A. ( 1974). "Baboons, space, time, and energy". American Zoologist, 14, 221-248.

Andrews M. W., & Rosenblum L. A. ( 1988) Relationship Between Foraging and Affiliative Social Referencing in Primates. In J. E. Fa & C. H. Southwick (Eds.), The ecology and behavior of food-enhanced primate groups (pp. 247-268). New York: Alan Liss.

Cheney D. L. ( 1977). "The acquisition of rank and the development of reciprocal alliances in freeraging immature baboons". Behavioral Ecology Sociobiology, 2, 303-317.

Clutton-Brock T. H. (Ed.). ( 1977). Primate ecology: Studies of feeding and ranging behavior in lemurs, monkeys and apes. London: Academic Press.

Crook J. H., & Gartlan J. S. ( 1966). "Evolution of primate societies". Nature, 210, 1200-1204.

Economos A. C. ( 1980). "Taxonomic differences in the mammalian life-span body weight relationship and the problem of brain weight". Gerontology, 26, 90-98.

Feinman S., & Lewis M. ( 1984). Is there social life beyond the dyad? A social-psychological view of social connections in infancy. In M. Lewis (Ed.), Beyond the dyad (pp. 13-42). New York: Plenum.

Garbarino J., & Crouter A. ( 1978). "Defining the community context for parent-child relations: The correlates of child maltreatment". Child Development, 49, 604-616.

Harlow H. F., Harlow M. K., Dodsworth R. O., & Arling G. L. ( 1966). "Maternal behavior of rhesus monkeys deprived of mothering and peer associations in infancy". Proceedings American Philosophical Society, 110, 58-66.

Leutenegger W. ( 1973). "Maternal-fetal weight relationships in primates". Folia Primatologica, 20, 280-293.

-37-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Intersections with Attachment
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 328

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.