Approaches to Joyce's Portrait: Ten Essays

By Thomas F. Staley; Bernard Benstock | Go to book overview

The Seven Lost Years of
A Portrait of the Artist
as a Young Man
2

HANS WALTER GABLER

JAMES JOYCE WROTE and rewrote the novel that was to become A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man in several phases between 1904 and 1914. In January 1904, he submitted the narrative essay "A Portrait of the Artist" to the Dublin literary magazine Dana. 1 Upon its rejection, he began to write Stephen Hero, planned to the length of sixty-three chapters. He was actively engaged upon it until the summer of 1905, when it broke off with chapter XXV. 2 It remained a fragment. In September 1907, when the plans for revision of the fragment had sufficiently matured in his mind, he began to write A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man in five chapters. This reached the state of an intermediary manuscript during 1907 to 1911. 3 In 1913-14, the novel was completed. It is represented in its final state by the fair-copy manuscript in Joyce's hand now in the possession of the National Library of Ireland in Dublin. Moreover, complete textual versions or fragments of text from each of the major stages of the novel's ten-year progression are still extant and identifiable. But it is also true that by far the majority of the materials, the plans, sketches, or intermediate drafts which as a body would have borne witness of its emergence, must be assumed to be lost. Nevertheless, close survey and careful scrutiny of those which survive make it

-25-

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Approaches to Joyce's Portrait: Ten Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - Strings in the Labyrinth: Sixty Years with Joyce's Portrait 3
  • Notes 23
  • 2 - The Seven Lost Years of a Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man 25
  • Appendix Stephen Hero 53
  • Notes 56
  • 3 - A Portrait and the Bildungsroman Tradition 61
  • Notes 74
  • 4 - A Portrait and Giambattista Vico: a Source Study 77
  • Notes 88
  • 5 - Epiphanies of Dublin 91
  • Notes 111
  • 6 - Consciousness and Society in a Portrait of the Artist 113
  • Notes 134
  • 7 - Baby Tuckoo: Joyce's "Features of Infancy" 135
  • Notes 168
  • 8 - The Cubist Portrait 171
  • Notes 184
  • 9 - A Light from Some Other World: Symbolic Structure in a Portrait of the Artist 185
  • Notes 211
  • 10 - In Ireland after a Portrait 213
  • Notes 235
  • Biographical Notes 239
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