Approaches to Joyce's Portrait: Ten Essays

By Thomas F. Staley; Bernard Benstock | Go to book overview

4
A Portrait and
Giambattista Vico:
A Source Study

MARGARET CHURCH

DESPITE THE WORK of the "new criticism," of various deterministic schools of thought, of psychological criticism, of studies of craftsmanship, or of social or psychological development, without source study one must ignore revealing literary relationships such as those between Crime and Punishment and The Trial, 1 between Don Quixote and Joseph Andrews or Madame Bovary, between Tristram Shandy and some of the novels of Virginia Woolf. A good source study provides one with material for understanding both the work influenced and the source. It enables one to place the work influenced in a literary context, to define it and its goals through such context, and to decide thereby how it succeeds and how it may fail. 2 In addition, Jorge Luis Borges has shown how awareness of source may enlarge understanding of the source itself: "Every writer," Borges claims, "creates his own precursors."3 In " Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote" Borges points out that Menard, in "composing" the Quixote, has enriched "the halting and rudimentary art of reading" through deliberate anachronism and that attributing Imitatio Christi to Céline or James Joyce is "sufficient renovation of its tenuous spiritual indications." 4 Thus he would argue that in attributing the Scienza nuova to James Joyce, one may gain insights into the writings

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Approaches to Joyce's Portrait: Ten Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - Strings in the Labyrinth: Sixty Years with Joyce's Portrait 3
  • Notes 23
  • 2 - The Seven Lost Years of a Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man 25
  • Appendix Stephen Hero 53
  • Notes 56
  • 3 - A Portrait and the Bildungsroman Tradition 61
  • Notes 74
  • 4 - A Portrait and Giambattista Vico: a Source Study 77
  • Notes 88
  • 5 - Epiphanies of Dublin 91
  • Notes 111
  • 6 - Consciousness and Society in a Portrait of the Artist 113
  • Notes 134
  • 7 - Baby Tuckoo: Joyce's "Features of Infancy" 135
  • Notes 168
  • 8 - The Cubist Portrait 171
  • Notes 184
  • 9 - A Light from Some Other World: Symbolic Structure in a Portrait of the Artist 185
  • Notes 211
  • 10 - In Ireland after a Portrait 213
  • Notes 235
  • Biographical Notes 239
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