Approaches to Joyce's Portrait: Ten Essays

By Thomas F. Staley; Bernard Benstock | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
This essay will not discuss the critical commonplace of distinguishing between Joyce and Stephen, nor with the reading of A Portrait as subtly ironic. A fictional persona is assumed, as well as a mode of ambiguity. Citations in the text are to A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man ( New York: Viking Press, 1964); Stephen Hero ( New York: New Directions, 1944; 1963); Ulysses ( New York: Random House, 1961).
2.
Robert Scholes and Richard M. Kain, eds., The Workshop of Daedalus: James Joyce and the Raw Materials for "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" ( Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 1965), p. 15.
3.
"Hunting Epiphany-Hunters," PMLA 137 ( March 1972): 304-06.
4.
Clive Hart and Leo Knuth, A Topographical Guide to James Joyce's "Ulysses" ( Colchester: A Wake Newslitter Press, 1975), list thirty-eight names of Dublin places and establishments in A Portrait, approximately half the number they find in Dubliners.
5.
The Workshop of Daedalus, p. 13.
6.
The street ballad is identified by Don Gifford and Robert Seidman in Notes for Joyce ( New York: E. P. Dutton, 1967) as "The Bonny Labouring Boy." It begins: "As I roved out one fine May morning, / All in the blooming spring. . . ."
7.
The prospectus is quoted by Kevin Sullivan in Joyce Among the Jesuits ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1958), pp. 231-33, and reprinted in part in The Workshop of Daedalus, p. 131.
8.
George A. Little, "James Joyce and Little's Death," The Irish Rosary 16 ( July-August 1962): 213-18. The photograph is on p. 215.
9.
Kevin Sullivan in Joyce Among the Jesuits, pp. 13-59, gives the most complete account of Clongowes Wood in Joyce's day. He notes that twelve of the sixteen boys mentioned are given their real names, fictitious names being given to undesirable characters such as Moonan, Athy, Boyle, and Corrigan (p. 48). Sullivan overlooks at least five. The other characters, in order of appearance, are Rodolph Kickham ( 1888-93), Christopher Roche ( 1888-92), John Cantwell ( 1888-89), Cecil Thunder ( 1889-94), John Lawton ( 1890-96), Charles Wells ( 1888-90), Michael Saurin ( 1887-93), Aloysius Fleming ( 1891-94), Patrick Rath ( 1886-91), James Magee ( 1889-92), "the Spaniard who was allowed to smoke cigars and the little Portugese" (13), that is, Jose Arana y Lupardo ( 1890-92) and Francisco da Silva Ruas ( 1891-93), "Kickham's brother" (40) Alexander ( 1886-90), "a fellow out of the second in grammar" (40), Dominick Kelly ( 1886-90), Thomas Furlong ( 1889-94) and Anthony MacSwiney ( 1889-91). Cf. list in T. S. J. Corcoran, The Clongowes Record 1814-1932 ( Dublin, n.d.), pp. 165-221. It is noteworthy that Joyce used more names from his brief stay at Clongowes Wood College than he did for his Belvedere College years.

-111-

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Approaches to Joyce's Portrait: Ten Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • 1 - Strings in the Labyrinth: Sixty Years with Joyce's Portrait 3
  • Notes 23
  • 2 - The Seven Lost Years of a Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man 25
  • Appendix Stephen Hero 53
  • Notes 56
  • 3 - A Portrait and the Bildungsroman Tradition 61
  • Notes 74
  • 4 - A Portrait and Giambattista Vico: a Source Study 77
  • Notes 88
  • 5 - Epiphanies of Dublin 91
  • Notes 111
  • 6 - Consciousness and Society in a Portrait of the Artist 113
  • Notes 134
  • 7 - Baby Tuckoo: Joyce's "Features of Infancy" 135
  • Notes 168
  • 8 - The Cubist Portrait 171
  • Notes 184
  • 9 - A Light from Some Other World: Symbolic Structure in a Portrait of the Artist 185
  • Notes 211
  • 10 - In Ireland after a Portrait 213
  • Notes 235
  • Biographical Notes 239
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