Aftermath of War: Americans and the Remaking of Japan, 1945-1952

By Howard B. Schonberger | Go to book overview

3 T. A. BISSON
The Limits of Reform in Occupied Japan

In his memoirs, former Prime Minister Yoshida Shigeru identified a group within the American Occupation bureaucracy as "radical elements--what might be called 'New Dealers'--who sought to utilize occupied Japan as an experimental ground for testing out their theories of progress and reform." He claimed that such "mistakes of the Occupation" as the decentralization of the police, the Labor Standards Law, the purge, and the antimonopoly program, resulted from the literal and overzealous interpretation of Washington directives by the "New Dealers." Government Section of SCAP, the prime minister recalled, housed more than its share of officials who had little understanding of actual conditions in postwar Japan or the practical needs of government. Thomas Arthur Bisson, "an enthusiastic New Dealer with advanced views regarding ways and means of democratizing our financial world," for exam- ple, had helped draft a purge plan for Japanese business which, had it been enforced, "would have played havoc with our national economy." Working with the "realists" in SCAP, Yoshida boasted he "never lost an opportunity to demand the revision and readjustment" of key Occupation-sponsored reforms and had been able "to temper the, at times, rigorous demands made by the Government Section."1

That Yoshida singled out Bisson for special criticism reflected not only Bisson's prominence as a SCAP "New Dealer," but his subsequent importance as a left-wing critic of the "New Japan." From April 1947, when he left Japan, until 1954, when his publishing career came to an abrupt end, Bisson authored two books and numerous articles which emphasized the failure of the Occupation to achieve the announced democratic aims of its initial post-

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aftermath of War: Americans and the Remaking of Japan, 1945-1952
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.