Life of Daniel Webster - Vol. 1

By George Ticknor Curtis | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V.
1813-1814.

MR. WEBSTER'S LIFE AT PORTSMOUTH--BIRTH OF DANIEL FLETCHER --GREAT FIRE IN THE TOWN--CONGRESS OF 1813-'14--RESOLUTIONS ON FRENCH DECREES--MILITARY TRIALS FOR TREASON-- ENCOURAGEMENT OF ENLISTMENTS--MODIFICATION OF THE EMBARGO--REPEAL OF THE RESTRICTIVE SYSTEM--DOMESTIC MANUFACTURES--PRACTICE IN SUPREME COURT--RETURNS HOME.

MR. WEBSTER reached his home in Portsmouth, from the special session of 1813, at about midsummer, and immediately resumed his usual avocations. His children were now two--Grace, who has been mentioned in the last chapter, and Daniel Fletcher, who was born July 23, 1813. Of his life at this time, we have already had some reminiscences from the pen of Mr. Ticknor.

The summer and autumn passed on as usual, but in December he was again on his way to attend the regular session of Congress, leaving Mrs. Webster and the children at home. While he was on this journey, a great conflagration swept over a considerable part of the town of Portsmouth, and his house was burnt, with others. The house had been purchased by Mr. Webster a short time before, for the sum of six thousand dollars. In addition to its furniture, his library was also lost; and, as there was no insurance on any part of the property, all that he had of worldly goods was completely gone. Mrs. Webster and the children found a temporary home in the family of

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Life of Daniel Webster - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents of Volume I xiii
  • Chapter I - 1782-1797 1
  • Chapter II - 1797-1801 26
  • Chapter III - 1801-1807 47
  • Chapter IV - 1807-1813 81
  • Chapter V - 1813-1814 115
  • Chapter VII - 1815-1816 146
  • Chapter VIII - 1816-1819 157
  • Chapter IX - 1820-1822 176
  • Chapter XI - 1824-1825 222
  • Chapter XII - 1825-1826 256
  • Chapter XIII - 1826-1827 282
  • Chapter XIV - 1827-1828 289
  • Chapter XV - 1828-1829 337
  • Chapter XVI - 1829-1830 347
  • Chapter XVII - 1830-1831 386
  • Chapter XVIII - 1831-1832 411
  • Chapter XIX - 1832-1833 429
  • Chapter XX - 1833-1834 470
  • Chapter XXI - 1834-1835 501
  • Chapter XXII 521
  • Chapter XXIII - 1836-18370 540
  • Chapter XXIV - 1837-1838 571
  • Appendix 581
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