Mitochondria and Other Cytoplasmic Inclusions

By The Company Of Biologists | Go to book overview

EXPLANATION OF PLATES

PLATEI
Neurones.
Fig. 1. The Golgi apparatus is seen as a series of apparently solid black strands lying in the cytoplasm around the nucleus. Aoyama silver preparation. x 2000.
Fig. 2. Showing parts of the Golgi apparatus as seen in fig. 1 in greater detail and at a slightly different focus. The apparently solid strands (Fig. 1) are now seen to consist of two parts, a chromophilic component and chromophobic vacuoles (compare strands 1, 2 in fig. 1 with strands 1, 2 in fig. 2). Aoyama silver preparation. x 2500.
Fig. 3. A sudan-black preparation photographed by ordinary transmitted light microscopy. Many fine lipoidal particles can be seen but little or no trace of the Golgi apparatus. x 2000.
Fig. 4. The same cell as seen in fig. 3, but photographed by phase-contrast microscopy. A series of elongate spaces can be seen which correspond to the chromophobic vacuoles seen in classical preparations. x 2000.
Fig. 5. A sudan-black preparation of a neurone photographed by phase-contrast microscopy. Here an elongate space, similar to the ones seen in fig. 4, is divided into separate vacuoles by dark strands. The vacuoles correspond to the chromophobic vacuoles seen in classical preparations and the dark strands to part of the chromophilic material (cf. fig. 2).x 2000.

PLATE 2
Endocrine cells of the pancreas, figs. 6-8. Exocrine cells of the pancreas, figs. 9-10. Cells of the anterior pituitary gland, figs. 11-13.
Fig. 6. A sudan-black preparation showing both the Golgi apparatus (chromophobic component) and lipoidal bodies. x 3500.
Figs. 7, 8. Aoyama silver preparations showing the chromophilic and chromophobic components of the Golgi apparatus as seen in the same cell at different foci. x 3500.
Fig. 9. A sudan-black preparation showing the Golgi apparatus (chrotnophobic component) and other cell inclusions. x 3500.
Fig. 10. An Aoyama silver preparation showing the two components of the Golgi apparatus as seen in a human pancreas cell. x 3500.
Fig. 11. A sudan-black preparation photographed by phase-contrast microscopy to show the Golgi apparatus (chromophobic component) an lipoidal bodies. x 2000.
Fig. 12. Showing some of the cells seen in fig. 11 as they appear by ordinary transmitted tight microscopy. The lipoidal bodies are seen more clearly but the Golgi apparatus (v) is only faintly visible. x 2000.
Fig. 13. Aoyama silver preparation showing the two components of the Golgi apparatus. x 2000.

PLATE 3
Absorptive cells of the intestinal epithelium, figs. 14-16. Male germ ceus, figs. 16-19.
Fig. 14. A sudan-black preparation showing numerous lipoidal bodies both in the Golgi zone and towards the cell border. x 1700.
Fig. 15. The same cells as seen in fig. 14 but photographed by phase-contrast microscopy. The Golgi apparatus (chromophobic component) can be seen quite clearly. x 1700.
Fig. 16. Aoyama silver preparation showing the chromophilic and chromophobic components of the Golgi apparatus. x 1700.
Fig. 17. Aoyama preparation of a spermatocyte showing the Golgi apparatus. Although it differs greatly in its appearance from the inclusion seen in fig. 16 it consists of the same two components: chromophilic material and chromophobic vacuoles. x 2000.
Fig. 18. Aoyama preparation of a spermatocyte with the chromophilic material of the Golgi apparatus enclosing a clear area near the nucleus. Some minute vacuoles can be seen embedded in the black strands of silver. In the upper and lower parts of the photomicrograph the Golgi apparatus appears as a solid mass of silver x 2000.
Fig. 19. A sudan-black preparation of spermatocytes. The sudan-black has coloured the chromophilic material of the Golgi apparatus and several fine particles of lipid. A number of minute vacuoles can be seen at the periphery of the chromophilic material. x 2000.

-90-

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