Seeking Victory on the Western Front: The British Army and Chemical Warfare in World War I

By Albert Palazzo | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Projects of this nature require the assistance of a great number of people. This work is no exception. It took its first form at The Ohio State University, Department of History and a debt of gratitude is owed to the faculty, particularly Drs. Williamson Murray, Allan R. Millett and John Guilmartin. Its present version was composed in the comfortable environment of the Australian Defence Force Academy, University College, University of New South Wales. I would like to thank Drs. Peter Dennis and Robin Prior at the School of History, ADFA. Most important, I must extend my appreciation to the staffs of numerous repositories whose assistance considerably eased the labors of this researcher.

I would like to thank the following institutions and individuals for the granting of permission to use their collections and to quote from materials in their possession: the Trustees of the Liddell Hart Centre for Military Archives; the Australian War Memorial; the Imperial War Museum; the National Army Museum; The Liddle Collection; and the Royal Artillery Historical Trust. My thanks also go to the National Library of Scotland and to the Rt. Hon The Earl Haig, as holder of his father's copyright, for permission to quote from the Haig Papers; and to M. A. F. Rawlinson for permission to use the Rawlinson Diary and T. C. Hartley for permission to use the Hartley Papers, both of which are held by the Churchill Archives Centre. For Rawlinson Fourth Army Records held at the Imperial War Museum, Crown copyright is reproduced with the permission of the Controller of Her Majesty's Stationery Office.

Financial support for this project was provided by a number of institutions. At The Ohio State University the Department of History and the Center for International Studies provided considerable help, as did the School of History at the Australian Defence Force Academy. Alpha Phi Delta Fraternity has my gratitude for a series of National Scholarships. The Australian War Memorial's offer of two grants-in-aid greatly eased the burden. I must also acknowledge the financial commitment and ongoing encouragement of the Joel M. Yarmush Fund.

Friends and family have played a significant role in the conception, development, and preparation of this work. I am grateful to Mr. Colin

-xi-

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Seeking Victory on the Western Front: The British Army and Chemical Warfare in World War I
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Gas Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Confronting the Western Front 6
  • Chapter 2 - Introduction and Reaction 41
  • Chapter 3 - Experimentation 78
  • Chapter 4 - Institutionalization 111
  • Chapter 5 - March to Victory 154
  • Conclusion 190
  • Notes 201
  • Index 233
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