Wordsworth and the Motions of the Mind

By Gordon Kent Thomas | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The Wordsworth Summer Conference at Dove Cottage, held each August in Grasmere, along with its February sister, the Wordsworth Winter School, is the most interesting, delightful, and valuable international gathering of scholars, students, and aficionados with a specific literary focus and locus that I have ever encountered. Many of the ideas and even a number of the phrases of this book had their first public presentation at sessions of that conference over the years since 1983. I am grateful to colleagues from many places who have gathered in Grasmere and who have listened to my lectures, responded to them, and helped in the refining of my ideas. I am particularly grateful to Richard and Sylvia Wordsworth, dear friends and superb organizers of the Wordsworth Conference, for repeated invitations to that best of Wordsworthian places and for their tireless skill and effort in making it what it is.

To Richard Wordsworth, who by his having accepted a visiting professorship at Brigham Young University became my close colleague and thereby laid himself open to such request, I am also indebted for his having read and offered helpful comments on the manuscript version of this book. He has shared that chore with others to whom I also express my deepest thanks: Norman Fruman of the University of Minnesota, Thomas McFarland of Princeton University, and Sue Weaver Schopf of the Humanities School of Continuing Education at Harvard--all of them true friends, colleagues, exemplars.

-vii-

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