Brain and Values: Is a Biological Science of Values Possible

By Karl H. Pribram | Go to book overview

10
Preserved Vocabulary and Reading Acquisition in an Amnesic Child

Charles, A. Ahern, Frank B. Wood, Christine M. McBrien Section of Neuropsychology Bowman Gray School of Medicine Medical Center Blvd. Winston-Salem, NC 27157 Telephone: 415-206-5270 Fax: 415-206-4722 E-Mail: ChuckA2651@aol.com


Abstract

This chapter presents the case of a nine year old boy who is amnesic as a result of congenital brain damage. Despite severe memory impairment for the events that constitute his experience, reading and vocabulary acquisition are shown to be within normal limits at age 9. This is interpreted as evidence of a dissociation between semantic and episodic memory systems. Observational data supporting this conclusion are also presented. The wider theoretical implications of this view are discussed. Methodologically, this study suggests there is value in attending to psychological variables in studies which aim to measure cognitive capabilities of brain-injured individuals.

This chapter will present findings concerning a remarkable nine year old boy, T.J., who is amnesic due to congenital brain damage. Specifically, we will focus on the implications of areas of preserved memory performance for a rather long-standing disagreement in the literature concerning theories which seek to describe the separate systems which constitute human memory.

While memory impairment in amnesia is diffuse, it is not global. Thirty years ago, Milner ( 1966) and Corkin ( 1968) focused renewed attention on the fact that some memory functions appear to be preserved in human amnesia. Case studies of two patients in particular, H.M. and N.A., demonstrated that amnesia involves selective memory impairment. These data converged with data from animal studies which indicated that the memory deficits which resulted from specific lesions were circumscribed and definable ( Pribram 1966, 1969).

These works engendered intensified interest in the nature of amnesia that has continued to the present day. When understood as a selective impairment, the nature of amnesia becomes subtle and fascinating. Since the Milner and Corkin studies, hundreds of papers have explored empirically which memory functions are spared in amnesia. The findings have served as the basis for theoretical accounts of distinct memory systems in amnesia. These accounts have also been considered relevant to understanding the structure of normal memory; that is, to identifying and defining distinct systems operating in normal memory ( Schacter, 1987).

Evidence for a distinct memory system usually features claims that the system can be behaviorally dissociated from other memory systems. Dissociation is demonstrated when performance on memory tasks assumed to represent one system is shown to be at a different level than performance on tasks

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Brain and Values: Is a Biological Science of Values Possible
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 568

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.