Brain and Values: Is a Biological Science of Values Possible

By Karl H. Pribram | Go to book overview

18
Values, Agency, and the Theory of Quantum Vacuum Interaction

Raymond Trevor Bradley Institute for Whole Social Science, Carmel, CA and Center for Brain Research and Informational Sciences Radford University September, 1997

Send All Correspondence Regarding This Manuscript To: Dr Raymond Trevor Bradley Institute for Whole Social Science 25400 Telarana Way Carmel, CA 93923 Tel. (408) 626-8057; FAX: (408) 622-9423


Abstract

Laszlo's theory of quantum vacuum interaction describes the evolution of all order in the universe as a result of the interaction between the holofield, a subquantum field of potential energy, and the multi-level hierarchy of matter and living systems. A review of the scheme reveals two problems which question its application to psycho-social interaction. One is the use of classical holography (image processing), which is inherently deterministic. The second is Laszlo's view of the brain as a passive processor of information. Both preclude human agency in the generation of psycho-social organization. An alternative approach is developed here that solves both of these problems. First, I draw on Piaget's work to show how thought and reason, and thus agency, is produced by the logic of cooperative interaction. And second, I use both classical holography and quantum holography (information processing) to develop a nondeter-minist account of communication in social collectives. The principles of classical holography are used to describe how purposeful action is imaged and processed; and the principles of quantum holography are used to describe how a stable order of endogenous organization is generated by the processing of information about the interactions among members. By describing how the collective's normative order (the system of shared values, beliefs, and norms) operates to effect the construction and regulation of the collective's communicative structure, I show how indeterminacy is introduced and, hence, the potential for an active human agent in social life.


Introduction

In his recent book, The Interconnected Universe, Ervin Laszlo ( 1995) outlines a general theory of nature, the "theory of quantum vacuum interaction" (QVI). The theory aims to describe the basic processes "whereby the universe evolves in an unbroken (though not necessarily linear)

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