Brain and Values: Is a Biological Science of Values Possible

By Karl H. Pribram | Go to book overview

and scope of relations among members, and hence the potentials for information flow, but it also establishes a distinctive psycho-social bandwidth for communication by attuning members to one another through its framework of shared values and beliefs. However, I am not substituting cultural determinism for holographic determinism here. In my account, the normative order is not a causal agent but plays a much more subtle role. It sets only the broad parameters within which the actual form and direction of collective organization evolves as a dynamic, self-organizing, multi-level process.

It is from this foundation that I develop an alternative non-determinist holographic account which uses the principles of both classical and quantum holography. The principles of quantum holography are used to describe how the interaction between flux and control creates a communicative structure that processes information on the interactions among members to in-form the collective's endogenous organization. And the principles of classical holography are used to describe the image processing required for the collective's purposeful action. Achievement of the collective's plan is modeled as a pattern-matching process in which the hologram for the plan is compared against successive quantum-holographic descriptions of the consequences of collective's action until a match is achieved. Figure 6 summarizes the combined logic of these processes of communication in the terms of a single substantive model.

A final point concerns a tantalizing question of connection between Laszlo's scheme and ours: namely, the relation between his concept of quantum vacuum interaction and our concept of flux. Could it be that flux, the distribution of energy in psycho-social fields, is actually mediated by the quantum vacuum? In discussing this question for future research with Karl Pribram, we believe that the answer may not lie in the already extensively studied properties of electromagnetic fields but must await improvements in the measurement of magnetic phenomena and gravity.


References

Ashby, W. R. ( 1956). An Introduction to Cybernetics. London: Chapman & Hall.

Bohm, D. ( 1980). Wholeness and the Implicate Order. London: Routledge.

Bohm, D., & B. J. Hiley ( 1993). The Undivided Universe. London: Routledge.

Bougon, M. G. ( 1983). "Uncovering cognitive maps: the self-Q technique". In G. Morgan (ed.), Beyond Method. Strategies for Social Research, pp. 173-188. New York: Sage Publications.

Bougon, M. G., & N. Baird ( 1987). Unfolding the wholistic social knowledge of novices and experts. Unpublished paper, presented to Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, New Orleans.

Bradley, R. T. ( 1987). Charisma and Social Structure: A Study of Love and Power, Wholeness and Transformation. New York: Paragon House.

Bradley, R. T. ( 1996). "The anticipation of order in biosocial collectives". World Futures: The Journal of General Evolution, Vol. 49: 93-116.

Bradley, R.T ( 1997; in press). "Quantum vacuum interaction and psycho-social organization". In D. Loye (ed.), The Evolutionary Outrider: The Impact of the Human Agent on Evolution, Chap. 10. New York: Gordon and Breach.

Bradley, R. T., & K. H. Pribram ( 1995). Communication and stability in social collectives. Unpublished manuscript. Carmel, CA: Institute for Whole Social Science.

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