Arming the Free World: The Origins of the United States Military Assistance Program, 1945-1950

By Chester J. Pach Jr. | Go to book overview

7
The Mutual Defense Assistance Program

The effect of the assumed military assistance program would be primarily psychological.

- Central Intelligence Agency, 24 February 1949

On 6 October 1949 President Harry S. Truman signed into law the Mutual Defense Assistance Act (MDAA), a landmark in the development of arms aid as a major instrument of containment. The first global military assistance legislation since lend-lease, the MDAA authorized $1.314 billion to arm thirteen countries and empowered the president to sell military equipment to other nations that joined the United States in defensive alliances and regional arrangements. Most aid went to signatories of the North Atlantic Treaty, but Greece, Turkey, Iran, Korea, and the Philippines also received grants of equipment, as did recipients in the "general area" of China, through the use of an unvouchered presidential emergency fund. The MDAA finally corrected the imbalance between the administration's desire and its capability to provide military assistance, a disparity that had hampered foreign policy planners since 1947. The new law, in short, was the culmination of a two-year effort to establish "a unified, cohesive military aid program" that could raise the morale of friendly nations and demonstrate American resolve to resist the expansion of Communist power. 1

Although the MDAA met many of the Truman administration's pressing needs, it left unresolved some critical problems. Administration officials admitted that the $1 billion reserved for the North Atlantic allies constituted interim assistance, but they had determined neither the duration nor the ultimate objective of such help. In Western Europe as well as in other countries that received American arms, MDAA planners hoped to stiffen the will to resist Communist pressures. But they lacked reliable methods of determining whether American aid could actually achieve that goal or how much aid might be necessary. In

-198-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Arming the Free World: The Origins of the United States Military Assistance Program, 1945-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - The Emergence of Military Assistance Programs 7
  • 2 - military Aid and Hemispheric Defense 29
  • 3 - The Limits of Aid to China 63
  • 4 - The Reorientation of American Arms Aid Policy: The Near East and the Truman Doctrine 88
  • 5 - The Decision for a Global Military Assistance Program 130
  • 6 - The Dilemma of Aid to China 160
  • 7 - The Mutual Defense Assistance Program 198
  • Epilogue 227
  • Notes 233
  • Bibliography 291
  • Index 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 326

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.