The Black Bard of North Carolina: George Moses Horton and His Poetry

By George Moses Horton; Joan R. Sherman | Go to book overview

INDEX OF TITLES
Acrostics, 61
Art of a Poet, The, 147
Cheerless Condition of Bachelorship, The, 128
Close of Life, The, 137
Connubial Felicity, 111
Creditor to His Proud Debtor, The, 96
Death of an Old Carriage Horse, 136
Division of an Estate, 100
Early Affection, 104
Excited from Reading the Obedience of Nature to Her Lord in the Vessel on the Sea, 55
Execution of Private Henry Anderson. . ., 143
Farewell to Frances, 141
Fate of an Innocent Dog, The, 106
Fearful Traveller in the Haunted Castle, The, 114
For the fair Miss M. M. McL[ean], 64
Gen. Grant -- The Hero of the War, 122
George Moses Horton, Myself, 121
Graduate Leaving College, The, 103
Gratitude, 58
Heavenly Love, 86
Horse Stolen from the Camp, The, 148
Imploring to be Resigned at Death, 102
Intemperance Club, The, 154
Jefferson in a Tight Place, 125
Liberty, 146
Lincoln is Dead, 127
Lines, On hearing . . ., 90
Lines to My -----, 60
Love, 78
Man, A Torch, 118
Meditation on a Cold, Dark and Rainy Night, 113
My Native Home, 142
New Fashions, 132
Obstruction of Genius, The, 156
On an Old Deluded Suitor, 95
One Generation Passeth Away and Another Cometh, 133
On Liberty and Slavery, 75
On Summer, 82
On the Evening and Morning, 87
On the Pleasures of College Life, 108
On the Poetic Muse, 89

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The Black Bard of North Carolina: George Moses Horton and His Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 44
  • Bibliography 47
  • Uncollected Poems 53
  • Poems from the Hope of Liberty 71
  • Poems from the Poetical Works 93
  • Poems from Naked Genius 119
  • Index of Titles 157
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