The City as Comedy: Society and Representation in Athenian Drama

By Gregory W. Dobrov | Go to book overview
67, found widespread in tragedy: "Any change, however slight, in the hierarchical classification of living creatures risks undermining the whole sacrificial structure" (39). According to Girard, the loss of cultural distinctions undermines the order, peace, and fecundity of the human community and motivates that internal or reciprocal violence (49) that it is the sole purpose of religion to prevent (55). Thus, Peisetairos' barbecue exemplifies the reciprocal violence that follows on the breakdown of the established sacrificial hierarchy (Also note 38.)
46.
Pozzi 1991, 149.
47.
On the dual etymology of this nonsense word, see Dobrov 1990, 210-11, and 1993, 192.
48.
De Romilly 1972 discusses the political history of the term in the fifth century.
49.
Pozzi 1991, 160.
50.
Cf. Foley 1975, 6-13, on this conclusion and on polis and oikos as mutually defining terms in Lysistrate. See also Taaffe 1993, 48-73, on the play On the other hand, a play like Lysistrate, when taken individually, may be interpreted one way, and in quite another way when read in the context of Aristophanes' oeuvre as a whole. Auger 1979, for example, argues that, in the poet's last plays (those after Birds), women "serve to reveal the impending catastrophe [for the existing order] and their presence on the stage signifies the disappearance of the civic body and the city" (108, quoted from her English summary).

Bibliography
Arrowsmith William. 1973. "Aristophanes' Birds: The Fantasy Politics of Eros." Ariong, n.s., 1.119-67.
Auger Danièle. 1979. "Le théâtre d'Aristophane: Le mythe, l'utopie et les femmes." Les Cahiers de Fontenay 17.71-101.
Bowie Angus. 1993. Aristophanes: Myth, Ritual and Comedy. Cambridge.
Cole Thomas. 1967. Democritus and the Sources of Greek Anthropology. American Philological Monographs 25. Cleveland.
Connor W R. 1977. "Tyrannis Polis." In Ancient and Modern: Essays in Honor of Gerald F. Else, edited by John D'Arms and John Eadie, 95-109. Ann Arbor.
Cook A. B. 1913. "Nephelokokkugia." In Studies Presented to William Ridgeway, edited by E. C. Quiggin , 213-21. Cambridge.
de Jaqueline Romilly. 1972. "Vocabulaire et propagande, ou les premiers emplois du mot homonoia." Études et Commentaires 79.199-209.
Detienne Marcel. "Culinary Practices and the Spirit of Sacrifice." In Cuisine, edited by Detienne and Vernant, 1-20.
Detienne Marcel, and Jean-Pierre Vemant, eds. 1989. The Cuisine of Sacrifice among the Greeks. Translated by Paula Wissig. Chicago.
Dobrov Gregory. 1990. "Aristophanes' Birds and the Metaphor of Deferral." Arethusa 23.2.209- 33.
-----. 1993. "The Tragic and Comic Tereus." AJP 114.189-234.
Dunbar Nan. 1995. Aristophanes' Birds. Oxford.
Foley Helene. 1975. "The 'Female Intruder' Reconsidered: Women in Aristophanes' Lysistrata and Ecclesiazusae. " CP 77.1-21.
Girard Rent. 1977. Violence and the Sacred. Translated by Patrick Gregory. Baltimore.
Green W C. 1879. The Birds of Aristophanes. Cambridge.
Hamilton Richard. 1985. "The Well-Equipped Traveller: Birds 42." GRBS 26.235-39.
Havelock Eric. 1958. The Liberal Temper in Greek Politics. New Haven.
Henderson Jeffrey. 1991. The Maculate Muse. 2d ed. New York.
Herington C. J. 1963. "A Study in the Prometheia, Part It: Birds and Prometheia." Phoenix 17.236-43.

-73-

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