The City as Comedy: Society and Representation in Athenian Drama

By Gregory W. Dobrov | Go to book overview
42.
Fr. 27.2 K.-A.; see K.-A. ad loc.
43.
There was a certain number of plays in which male πορνοβοσκοί played the central or title part: see Nesselrath 1990, 324.
44.
The translation tries to take into account the textual doubtfulness of this line.
45.
Another problematic line, which Dobree 1832, 318, and Richards 1909, 76-77, even considered deleting.
46.
The translation is again based on Gulick 1930, 53-55, modified in some places because of the somewhat different text in K.-A.
47.
In yet another fragment ( Euphanes, Μου + ̑σαι fr. 1 K.-A.) Phoenicides is depicted like a Homeric hero, provoking all around to rival him in emptying a still-boiling-hot plate of seafood.
48.
See Anaxilas, Μονότροπος fr. 20 K.-A., and Antiphanes, Κιθαρῳδός fr. 117 K.-A.
49.
See Kirchner 1899; Davies 1971, 566sq.
50.
This title is probably to be preferred to Sicyonius; see now Belardinelli 1994, 56-59.
51.
Men. Sic.176-271; Eur. Or.866-956; see Hofmeister's essay below.
52.
This is a duty slaves very often have to fulfill in the fragments of Middle Comedy; see Nesselrath 1990, 285-95.
53.
See Alexis, Γυναακοκρατία fr. 43 K.-A. ( Hippocles); Eubulus fr. 134 K.-A. ( Nicostratus); Timocles, "Hρωες fr. 14 K.-A. (Satyrus); Alexis, Λίνος fr. 140.12-16 K.-A. (Simus); Ephippus, "Ομοι ἢ ̓Οβελιαφόροι fr. 16 K.-A. ( Theodorus); Antiphanes, Λύκων (?).
54.
Exceptions are few and apparently concentrated within a couple of years after the upheaval of 307, when the Macedonian garrison in Munychia and Demetrius of Phalerum (who reigned in Athens by the grace of King Cassander) were thrown out by Demetrius Poliorcetes, who subsequently became the new overlord of the reestablished democracy (see now Habicht 1995, 74-87, 107): in a fragment of the comic poet Alexis (who by now had been active on the Athenian stage for about half a century), a speaker effusively welcomes a political measure proposed by the politician Sophocles and favored by Demosthenes' nephew Demochares and apparently by Demetrius Poliorcetes himself that aimed at bringing the philosophical schools under the control of the Athenian demos ( Alexis fr. 99 K.-A.). In a lost play of the comic poet Archedicus, a severe invective seems to have been vented against the just-mentioned Demochares ( Archedicus fr. 4 K.-A.); and a similarly severe invective was brought forth against the politician Stratocles (the foremost henchman of Demetrius Poliorcetes in Athens) by the comic poet Philippides (fr. 25 K.-A.), who himself was politically active in those decades (see test. 3 K.-A.) and had enduring connections with another important diadoch, Lysimachus. All these instances of politics once more surfacing in comedy significantly occur between 307 and about 300 B.C.; those years may therefore have been the last phase in Athenian history when comedy raised something like a political voice, which, however, looks only like a rather feeble echo of the headier years before 322. From none of the "big three" of New Comedy ( Menander, Diphilus, Philemon) is any expression of overtly political significance extant within the remains of their comedies. Menander may have endorsed the institutions of his native polis, as Hofmeister's essay below shows, but he remains studiously vague (the assembly at Eleusis treated at length in Sicyonians was surely possible even under the conditions of restricted franchise in the years immediately after 322 and under Demetrius of Phalerum). Menander himself briefly got into political trouble in 307 because he seemed to have been too closely connected with the now banished Demetrius (test. 8 Koerte); but this was probably not because of any explicit statements in support of Demetrius' politics in his comedies.

Bibliography
Belardinelli Anna Maria. 1994. Menandro, Sicioni. Introduzione, testo e commento. Bari.
Breitenbach H. 1908. De genere quodam titulorum comoediae Atticae. Basel.
Davies J. K. 1971. Athenian Propertied Families. Oxford.

-287-

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