We Charge Genocide: The Historic Petition to the United Nations for Relief from a Crime of the United States Government against the Negro People

By Civil Rights Congress | Go to book overview

Preface

by Ossie Davis

This is not the first time the black people of the United States have issued a warning. W. E. B. Du Bois himself said it plain in 1900: "The problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color line."

We say again, now: We will submit no further to the brutal indignities being practiced against us; we will not be intimidated, and most certainly not eliminated. We claim the ancient right of all peoples, not only to survive unhindered, but also to participate as equals in man's inheritance here on earth. We fight to preserve ourselves, to see that the treasured ways of our life-in-common are not destroyed by brutal men or heedless institutions.

We Charge Genocide! indeed we do, for we would save ourselves and our children. History has taught us prudence -- we do not need to wait until the Dachaus and Belsens and the Buchenwalds are built to know that we are dying. We live with death and it is ours; death not so obvious as Hitler's ovens -- not yet. But who can tell?

Black men were brought to this country to serve an economy which needed our labor. And even when slavery was over, there was still a need for us in the American economy as cheap labor. We picked the cotton, dug the ditches, shined the shoes, swept the floors, hustled the baggage, washed the clothes, cleaned the toilets -- we did the dirty work for all America -- that was our place, the place where the American economy needed us to be.

As long as we stayed in that place -- there at the bottom -- we were welcomed to love and work in America. The murder practiced against us then was partial and selective. A limited genocide meant not so much to exterminate us -- America still had a job for "good niggers" to do -- as to warn us, to correct us, to use those of us who would not submit as examples of what could happen to the rest of us. Those who objected to being kept in their "place" at the bottom were beaten or killed for being uppity. Those who challenged our racist overlords, claiming for themselves and for us our rights as men and as citizens, were burned for being insolent; lynched to teach the rest of us always to stay in our "place."

But a revolution of profoundest import is taking place in America. Every year our economy produces more and more goods and services with fewer and fewer men. Hard, unskilled work -- the kind nobody else wanted, that made

-v-

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We Charge Genocide: The Historic Petition to the United Nations for Relief from a Crime of the United States Government against the Negro People
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Foreword to New Edition vii
  • Article II, Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide xii
  • Contents xiii
  • The Petitioners xvii
  • Part I - The Opening Statement 1
  • To the General Assembly of the United Nations 3
  • Part II - The Law and the Indictment 29
  • The Law and the Indictment 31
  • Part III - The Evidence 55
  • The Evidence 57
  • Part IV - Summary and Prayer 193
  • Summary and Prayer 195
  • Part V - Appendix 199
  • Selected Bibliography 238
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