We Charge Genocide: The Historic Petition to the United Nations for Relief from a Crime of the United States Government against the Negro People

By Civil Rights Congress | Go to book overview

The Petitioners
Alzira Albaugh, New Mexico Howard Fast, New York
Mike Babinchok, Ohio Winifred Feise, Louisiana
Charlotta A. Bass, California James Ford, New York
Isadore Begun, New York Josephine Grayson, Virginia
Richard O. Boyer, New York Abner Green, New York
Maurice Braverman, Maryland Yvonne Gregory, New York
Louis E. Burnham, New York Aubrey Grossman, New York
Harold Christoffel, Wisconsin William Harrison, Massachusetts
Charles Collins, New York Harry Haywood, New York
Ralph Cooper, New Jersey James R. Herman, Louisiana
Dr. Matthew Crawford, California Rev. Charles A. Hill, Michigan
George Crockett Jr., Michigan William Hood, Michigan
Wendell Phillips Dabney, Ohio W. Alphaeus Hunton, New York
John Daschbach, Washington Dorothy Hunton, New York
Benjamin J. Davis Jr., New York Arnold Johnson, Pennsylvania
Carmen Davis, Tennessee Dr. Oakley C. Johnson, Louisiana
Lester Davis, Illinois Claudia Jones, New York
Angie Dickerson, South Carolina John Hudson Jones, New York
Dr. W. E. B. Du Bois, New York Rev. Obadiah Jones, Missouri
Roscoe Dunjee, Oklahoma Leon Josephson, New York
Jack Dyhr, Oregon Albert Kahn, New York
Collis English, New Jersey Mary Kalb, Virginia
Maude White Katz, New York

-xvii-

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We Charge Genocide: The Historic Petition to the United Nations for Relief from a Crime of the United States Government against the Negro People
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Foreword to New Edition vii
  • Article II, Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide xii
  • Contents xiii
  • The Petitioners xvii
  • Part I - The Opening Statement 1
  • To the General Assembly of the United Nations 3
  • Part II - The Law and the Indictment 29
  • The Law and the Indictment 31
  • Part III - The Evidence 55
  • The Evidence 57
  • Part IV - Summary and Prayer 193
  • Summary and Prayer 195
  • Part V - Appendix 199
  • Selected Bibliography 238
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